Wired new arrival for Story: The Writer's Guide to Using Brain Science to Hook Readers from the Very First popular Sentence sale

Wired new arrival for Story: The Writer's Guide to Using Brain Science to Hook Readers from the Very First popular Sentence sale

Wired new arrival for Story: The Writer's Guide to Using Brain Science to Hook Readers from the Very First popular Sentence sale
Wired new arrival for Story: The Writer's Guide to Using Brain Science to Hook Readers from the Very First popular Sentence sale_top
Wired new arrival for Story: The Writer's Guide to Using Brain Science to Hook Readers from the Very First popular Sentence sale__front

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This guide reveals how writers can utilize cognitive storytelling strategies to craft stories that ignite readers’ brains and captivate them through each plot element.

Imagine knowing what the brain craves from every tale it encounters, what fuels the success of any great story, and what keeps readers transfixed. Wired for Story reveals these cognitive secrets—and it’s a game-changer for anyone who has ever set pen to paper.

The vast majority of writing advice focuses on “writing well” as if it were the same as telling a great story. This is exactly where many aspiring writers fail—they strive for beautiful metaphors, authentic dialogue, and interesting characters, losing sight of the one thing that every engaging story must do: ignite the brain’s hardwired desire to learn what happens next. When writers tap into the evolutionary purpose of story and electrify our curiosity, it triggers a delicious dopamine rush that tells us to pay attention. Without it, even the most perfect prose won’t hold anyone’s interest.

Backed by recent breakthroughs in neuroscience as well as examples from novels, screenplays, and short stories, Wired for Story offers a revolutionary look at story as the brain experiences it. Each chapter zeroes in on an aspect of the brain, its corresponding revelation about story, and the way to apply it to your storytelling right now.

Review

As both a publishing veteran and a TV pro, Lisa Cron knows storytelling. In Wired for Story she shares her fascinating psychological approaches to the craft. Her fresh way of looking at the core essentials of writing has our neurons firing. 
- Writer''s Digest


. . . how can you craft a story compelling enough to keep readers turning the pages deep into the night? The answer lies in a new book linking writing to neuroscience, Lisa Cron''s Wired for Story: The Writer''s Guide to Using Brain Science.
- Arnie Cooper - Poets & Writers

Lisa Cron''s Wired for Story: The Writer''s Guide to Using Brain Science to Hook Readers from the Very First Sentence is relentlessly interesting because it reveals how our brains perceive and process stories and narratives.  Ms. Cron walks the writer through the mental architecture of a story, patiently revealing what works and what doesn''t and why. She writes with clarity and humor about elementary things every writer could profit from revisiting under her auspices. Who would have thought anyone could make the intricacies of brain science accessible?  
- Pittsburgh Post-Gazette

About the Author

LISA CRON is the author of Wired for Story and Story Genius. Her TEDx talk, Wired for Story opened Furman University''s 2014 TEDx Conference, Stories: The Common Thread of Our Humanity. Lisa has worked in publishing at W.W. Norton, as an agent at the Angela Rinaldi Literary Agency, as a producer on shows for Showtime and Court TV, and as a story analyst for Warner Brothers and the William Morris Agency. Since 2006 she has been an instructor in the UCLA Extension Writers'' Program, and she is on the faculty of the School of Visual Arts MFA Program in Visual Narrative in New York City. She is a frequent presenter at writers conferences, universities and schools nationwide, and in her work as a story coach Lisa helps novelists, screenwriters and journalists wrangle the story they want to tell onto the page.

Excerpt. © Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved.

I find that most people know what a story is until they sit down to write one.
—Flannery O’Connor
 
In the second it takes you to read this sentence, your senses are showering you with over 11,000,000 pieces of information. Your conscious mind is capable of registering about forty of them. And when it comes to actually paying attention? On a good day, you can process seven bits of data at a time. On a bad day, five.(1) On one of those days? More like minus three.
     And yet, you’re not only making your way in a complex world just fine, you’re preparing to write a story about someone navigating a world of your creation. So how important can any of those other 10,999,960 bits of information really be?
Very, as it turns out—which is why, although we don’t register them consciously, our brain is busy noting, analyzing, and deciding whether they’re something irrelevant (like the fact that the sky is still blue) or something we need to pay attention to (like the sound of a horn blaring as we meander across the street, lost in thought about the hunky guy who just moved in next door).
     What’s your brain’s criterion for either leaving you in peace to daydream or demanding your immediate and total attention? It’s simple. Your brain, along with every other living organism down to the humble amoeba, has one main goal: survival. Your subconscious brain—which neuroscientists refer to as the adaptive or cognitive unconscious—is a finely tuned instrument, instantly aware of what matters, what doesn’t, why, and, hopefully, what you should do about it.(2) It knows you don’t have the time to think, “Gee, what’s that loud noise? Oh, it’s a horn honking; it must be coming from that great big SUV that’s barreling straight at me. The driver was probably texting and didn’t notice me until it was too late to stop. Maybe I should get out of the—”
Splat.
     And so, to keep us from ending up as road kill, our brain devised a method of sifting through and interpreting all that information much, much faster than our slowpoke conscious mind is capable of. Although for most other animals that sort of innate reflex is where evolution called it a day, thus relegating their reactions to what neuroscientists aptly refer to as zombie systems, we humans got a little something extra.(3) Our brain developed a way to consciously navigate information so that, provided we have the time, we can decide on our own what to do next.
Story.
     Here’s how neuroscientist Antonio Damasio sums it up: “The problem of how to make all this wisdom understandable, transmissible, persuasive, enforceable—in a word, of how to make it stick—was faced and a solution found. Storytelling was the solution—storytelling is something brains do, naturally and implicitly. . . . [I]t should be no surprise that it pervades the entire fabric of human societies and cultures.”(4)
     We think in story. It’s hardwired in our brain. It’s how we make strategic sense of the otherwise overwhelming world around us. Simply put, the brain constantly seeks meaning from all the input thrown at it, yanks out what’s important for our survival on a need-to-know basis, and tells us a story about it, based on what it knows of our past experience with it, how we feel about it, and how it might affect us. Rather than recording everything on a first come, first served basis, our brain casts us as “the protagonist” and then edits our experience with cinema-like precision, creating logical interrelations, mapping connections between memories, ideas, and events for future reference.(5)
     Story is the language of experience, whether it’s ours, someone else’s, or that of fictional characters. Other people’s stories are as important as the stories we tell ourselves. Because if all we ever had to go on was our own experience, we wouldn’t make it out of onesies.
     Now for the really important question—what does all this mean for us writers? It means that we can now decode what the brain (aka the reader) is really looking for in every story, beginning with the two key concepts that underlie all the cognitive secrets in this book:
 
1. Neuroscientists believe the reason our already overloaded brain devotes so much precious time and space to allowing us to get lost in a story is that without stories, we’d be toast. Stories allow us to simulate intense experiences without actually having to live through them. This was a matter of life and death back in the Stone Age, when if you waited for experience to teach you that the rustling in the bushes was actually a lion looking for lunch, you’d end up the main course. It’s even more crucial now, because once we mastered the physical world, our brain evolved to tackle something far trickier: the social realm. Story evolved as a way to explore our own mind and the minds of others, as a sort of dress rehearsal for the future.(6) As a result, story helps us survive not only in the life-and-death physical sense but also in a life-well-lived social sense. Renowned cognitive scientist and Harvard professor Steven Pinker explains our need for story this way:
 
     Fictional narratives supply us with a mental catalogue of the fatal conundrums we might face someday and the outcomes of strategies we could deploy in them. What are the options if I were to suspect that my uncle killed my father, took his position, and married my mother? If my hapless older brother got no respect in the family, are there circumstances that might lead him to betray me? What’s the worst that could happen if I were seduced by a client while my wife and daughter were away for the weekend? What’s the worst that could happen if I had an affair to spice up my boring life as the wife of a country doctor? How can I avoid a suicidal confrontation with raiders who want my land today without looking like a coward and thereby ceding it to them tomorrow? The answers are to be found in any bookstore or any video store. The cliché that life imitates art is true because the function of some kinds of art is for life to imitate it.(7)
           
2. Not only do we crave story, but we have very specific hardwired expectations for every story we read, even though—and here’s the kicker—chances are next to nil that the average reader could tell you what those expectations are. If pressed, she’d be far more likely to refer to the magic of story, that certain je ne sais quoi that can’t be quantified. And who could blame her? The real answer is rather counterintuitive: our expectations have everything to do with the story’s ability to provide information on how we might safely navigate this earthly plane. To that end, we run them through our own very sophisticated subconscious sense of what a story is supposed to do: plunk someone with a clear goal into an increasingly difficult situation they then have to navigate. When a story meets our brain’s criteria, we relax and slip into the protagonist’s skin, eager to experience what his or her struggle feels like, without having to leave the comfort of home.
 
     All this is incredibly useful for writers because it neatly defines what a story is—and what it’s not. In this chapter, that’s exactly what we’ll examine: the four elements that make up what a story is; what we, as readers, are wired to expect when we dive into the first page of a book and try it on for size; and why even the most lyrical, beautiful writing by itself is as inviting as a big bowl of wax fruit. 

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4.7 out of 54.7 out of 5
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Top reviews from the United States

Wikileaker
2.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Okay only if you''re a rank beginner trying to write chick lit
Reviewed in the United States on April 22, 2019
This blurb for this book makes some bold claims: "a revolutionary look at story" "recent breakthroughs in neuroscience" "Wired for Story reveals these cognitive secrets" "ignite the brain''s hardwired desire to learn what happens next" "what... See more
This blurb for this book makes some bold claims:

"a revolutionary look at story"
"recent breakthroughs in neuroscience"
"Wired for Story reveals these cognitive secrets"
"ignite the brain''s hardwired desire to learn what happens next"
"what fuels the success of any great story and what keeps readers transfixed"
"aspect[s] of the brain, its corresponding revelation about story, and the way to apply it"

Wow! Sounds exciting, doesn''t it?
Well don''t be. Take my word for it that this book fails to live up to these grandiose claims.

That said, I must add that the advice given in the book isn''t wrong or inapplicable. The book does have some value, but only for the beginner struggling to craft his very first story. In other words, for someone who knows next to nothing about story creation and writing execution. The information is very basic and is no more than what you would find in the many many other books that have been published for novice storytellers and writers. Without all the brain science hype.

The few examples of neurological research cited in ''Wired'' are superficial gee-whiz Mr. Science factoids, like "when the hero realizes he''s really up the creek, all these different brain areas light up!" Golly gee-willickers! There are no specific tips that will instruct you as to what particular storytelling techniques will accomplish this in your story blueprint. Nor much apart from the standard writing wisdom that will help you as a writer. Actually, the blurb for WIred contains about as much info in this area as does the book itself: "ignite the brain''s hardwired desire to learn what happens next". Ask yourself how many times you''ve read about a terrific bestseller described as a "page turner" ?? That''s all there is to it, folks! This book ''Wired'' has no discussion of what suspense is, and how it is created in the mind of the readrer. You''re better off reading scholarly criticism of Hitchcock movies (plenty of that!) than wasting time on this book.

The advice given for story creation is the same old same old you can get in most any of the how-to writing books available from Writer''s DIgest.. Stuff like you must have a Protagonist, who has a problem, and has to overcome the Antagonist(s) and obstacle(s) to attain his Goal and the answer to the Story Question...blah blah. Good advice, yet anyone who has researched this topic will have seen it all before.

The examples cited mostly have to do with romance. The main example is Gone With the Wind. The made-up story fragments given as examples are also boy-meets-girl type stuff. Cron does briefly mention the movies Fractured and Die Hard (once each). She uses Fractured to point out that the protagonist doesn''t have to appear from scene one, and the story''s beginning has to build up to it. Heard it before. As for Die Hard, the difficulties McClane has with his wife didn''t really contribute much to the story. Another example given is the movie It''s a Wonderful LIfe but I only had time for one Jimmy Stewart movie and it was Mister Smith.

Examples like these are pretty much useless for someone like me striving to create stories with a more masculine bent. I have two specific recommendations: 1) watch the reimagined Battlestar Galactica TV series. Ron Moore and crew did a great job crafting believable character arcs and internal motivations for the cast and plot. 2) Read Thinking Fast and Slow by Daniel Kahneman. Now, this book is mainly about the psychology of economic decision making. But it has very much to do with the way people perceive meaning (which is what a reader is supposed to get from a good story). Perceiving meaning seems to happen effortlessly, and it does if a tale is well crafted and well told. But it does not happen effortlessly. Kahneman explains the nuts-and-bolts of how the unconscious ''System 1'' constructs meaning by making up stories that give meaning to a person''s life experiences. This is a gold mine of psychology you can use in your storytelling. You will get more useful brain science in one chapter of Kahneman''s book than you will in this entire book ''Wired".

Also, necessarily, economics has alot to do with making predictions and forecasts. And Kahneman deftly illustrates how our built-in System One cognitive biases play into that, and how they are manipulated by various forces in capitalist society (like marketers and political pundits). And you can use those same techniques to manipulate the emotions of the readers of your story, which is exactly what you must do to be a successful storyteller. ''Wired For Story'' would have you believe that emotion is all there is for the reader in a story. This is wrong. Story is the one and only artform that engages the mind of the reader. Music, painting, sculpture, dance...all other artforms are purely emotional, and do not spur thought. So the writer, of all artists, has the obligation and responsibility of engaging the intellect as well the senses. Kahneman informs you the storyteller how you can use the reader''s mind to elicit his emotional System 1 -- as Cron and her citations of brain studies cannot. He is a scientist much better acquainted with human nature than any neurologist, because his science is experimental psychology. And he''s a Nobel prizewinning one, to boot.

I present the story Airframe by Michael Crichton as the prime example of how to use the logical System 2 effectively as a storyteller. There is practically no depiction of emotion in this novel; it''s all matter-of-fact plot presented as dry series of events external to the characters. Yes, it has a protagonist Casey Singleton with a Story Goal and internal issues. All well and good. But the point is the storytelling itself is all ''Outside In'' as they say in writing circles. The conventional wisdom says that this a formula for failure: a dry-as-dust boring narration. Yet Crichton amply demonstrates that it is possible to engage the reader''s sympathies through his mind alone. And this is something only a writer can do. In actuality, there are other kinds of good stories than the one Ms. Cron insists on.

Some of the writing advice in ''Wired'' isn''t even very good. For example, she shows how to handle first-person narration. BUT she insists that the narrator is always the protagonist. Not true, and poor strategy. For one thing, the protagonist has to be in every single scene. Second, the protagonist-narrator has a need for modesty imposed upon him, or else he would come across as obnoxiously boastful of his daring deeds. Third, the narrator is severely restricted in commenting on the action and supplying background information. And the best tales feature the narrator in this important role of commentator and information source. Think of how Watson narrated Sherlock Holmes'' tales, and in Donna Tart''s Secret History the narrator (Richard Papen) acted as observer to the murder-minded Greek classics students. Yes, I know Suzanne Collins made 50 million writing Hunger Games with its first person protagonist, but that doesn''t make it an example good writing. It was a success in spite of its quality of writing. In fact it was awful; I couldn''t even finish the book the viewpoint used was so irritating. But I must concede that the quality of the story did overcome its poor execution.

Cron seems to believe that there is only one kind of possible story: one protagonist with an internal conflict who must have a story goal and obstacles to surmount. That''s fine, probably the ideal that one would like to strive for. But she doesn''t give any advice on how to conceive of story situations that could produce such a result. You the reader-writer are on your own; no inspiration for creativity is even hinted at.

The book is mediocre at best. I give two stars only because it does have some useful information, but only for novice writer-storytellers. You can get better advice almost anywhere else, without all the hype and gee-whiz brain science filler.
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C. F. King
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Great book
Reviewed in the United States on January 26, 2018
I have been an author for decades and published 4 books. I''ve been an editor for over a decade and this book is perfect for seasoned and new writers. It certainly made me take a new, long look at the latest book I''m busy with. I think it''s great for getting one focused on... See more
I have been an author for decades and published 4 books. I''ve been an editor for over a decade and this book is perfect for seasoned and new writers. It certainly made me take a new, long look at the latest book I''m busy with. I think it''s great for getting one focused on the important points. I loved it. There wasn''t too much about how the brain works to bore one or make it feel like a technical book on neuroscience. I found her writing style amusing and entertaining. I will definitely recommend it to all my clients and writing friends. There was nothing in the book I didn''t know, but this book forces one to focus on the bigger picture. It doesn''t matter how accomplished one is as a writer, one can always learn more. And I certainly did with this book. So, thank you, Ms. Cron.

I saw the negative three or fewer star comments and can only think the commentators didn''t see what the author was actually trying to convey. It''s a classic lesson in the KISS method (keep it simple stupid) and I loved it.

This isn''t a full-on, in-depth analysis of every part of the craft of writing, as many seemed to expect, that would take 12 full books or more. This is also not only for beginners as some suggest. To them I would say, don''t let hubris cloud your ability to write better--think beyond that--read the book again. I think the book serves as an excellent reference to keep us on track when we lose the plot, so to speak.

Seasoned writers can get quite jaded and write almost on auto-pilot at times--not good. Thank you, Ms. Cron, for putting me back on track and making me excited to re-write and re-edit my latest book, my first YA fantasy, for the zillionth time. I was out of my comfort zone with this book and feeling a bit overwhelmed and unsure. Wired for Story has me fired up to go forth and do this.

I highly recommend this book, especially for seasoned writers.
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Verified Purchase
1.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Trigger Warning
Reviewed in the United States on July 28, 2020
** Trigger Warning ** I bought the physical copy of this book so I could unwind before bed without looking at my phone. It was an interesting read until page 14 where they casually mention using rape as a plot device. I’m currently in therapy to cope with being... See more
** Trigger Warning **

I bought the physical copy of this book so I could unwind before bed without looking at my phone. It was an interesting read until page 14 where they casually mention using rape as a plot device. I’m currently in therapy to cope with being raped and the last thing I needed was to be reminded of it right before bed in a book that should be safe to read.

Don’t use rape as a plot device. It’s too painful a topic to be used nonchalantly.
16 people found this helpful
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DrPat
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Story Is a Survival Mechanism
Reviewed in the United States on June 5, 2017
Our brains, Lisa Cron tells us, are designed by evolution to reward us for paying attention to a certain kind of story. The tale that rewards us is one that promises a lesson—and then delivers. The protagonist must confront a choice that matters to his or her life. Whatever... See more
Our brains, Lisa Cron tells us, are designed by evolution to reward us for paying attention to a certain kind of story. The tale that rewards us is one that promises a lesson—and then delivers. The protagonist must confront a choice that matters to his or her life. Whatever choice is made, the consequences that follow are the lesson, and such learning, even through the mythical lessons of others'' success or failure, is a survival mechanism.

So: Should Joe have bacon or kippers for breakfast? Not a world-shaking or life-changing choice.

Except... what if choosing bacon meant that Joe would soon be in a battle for his life, because of a mutated pestilence that had infected the swine from which the bacon was made? To catch the reader''s attention, the story must show right from the beginning the serious nature of Joe''s breakfast choice, and then incorporate the consequences in a way that rewards the expectant reader.

According to Cron, it isn''t the obviousness of the dilemma, but the way it is presented—the way it is written—that absorbs that survival skill in the brain, and rewards the ardent listener to a well-told story.
31 people found this helpful
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Katia Hart
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
The science behind reader''s expectations and what that means for writers.
Reviewed in the United States on October 4, 2017
I liked this book. As a writer and self-professed nerd, it was right up my alley. But the science isn''t so hard-core that it should frighten any non-nerds away! It''s a good overview of what readers expectations for stories are.... and why that is. That''s always... See more
I liked this book. As a writer and self-professed nerd, it was right up my alley. But the science isn''t so hard-core that it should frighten any non-nerds away!

It''s a good overview of what readers expectations for stories are.... and why that is. That''s always useful information as we are going through the writing and editing process, especially if we want the best, most polished and marketable product possible. Art is art. But in the end, it doesn''t matter how beautiful your prose, because story does matter. If you want something that emotionally appeals to readers and will actually sell, this book could help you.

Loved the mention of using engrams for character development. I''ve toyed around with this in my writing. I think it would help lots of writers make characters that are more believable and consistent in their actions.
16 people found this helpful
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arch_reviews
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A Cheeky Novel about writing cheeky novels
Reviewed in the United States on December 4, 2014
Wired for Story is a book full of solid, albeit basic, advice for story tellers, and in particular writers trying to develop their craft. It succeeds in some areas while falls down in others, however I found it solid and well written overall. Where it succeeds is in... See more
Wired for Story is a book full of solid, albeit basic, advice for story tellers, and in particular writers trying to develop their craft. It succeeds in some areas while falls down in others, however I found it solid and well written overall.
Where it succeeds is in its brevity and clarity. The author gets right to the point and even provides short lists at times of what to do and how to do it. Her writing is also peppered with cheeky humor which is humorous in a thats-almost-funny kind of way that is refreshing compared to the textbook style adopted by many how-to-write books.
Where the book fell down, for me, was in its limited examples and scope. It really felt like the author was addressing romance writers, for the most part. I could think of a few counter examples to some of her rules, although one would have to leave the romance genre for those to work. But for a 230 page book, that is minor discrepancy.
The second thing I noticed, which has already been pointed out by others, is that the brain science was limited. In fact, it was mostly only refereed to in footnote. Personally, that was fine with me, but I could see why it made others feel misled (it is in the title, after all).
29 people found this helpful
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Kim Burdick
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Wired for Story
Reviewed in the United States on December 10, 2014
Pg 24. "Here''s a disconcerting thought: marketers, politicians, and televangelists know more about story than most writers. This is because, by definition, they start with something writers often never even think about--the point their story will make."... See more
Pg 24. "Here''s a disconcerting thought: marketers, politicians, and televangelists know more about story than most writers. This is because, by definition, they start with something writers often never even think about--the point their story will make."

Extraordinary--and somewhat frightening-- to be re-reading this book in the week''s following the 2016 election. The deeper into the book I get, the more real the political articles and memes become.

I read this book twice, with a several month break inbetween. Curiously enough, I liked it much better the second time when I was actively taking notes. There is much practical advice here and taking "Wired for Story" seriously will help you keep your audience in mind. By looking at how and why readers engage with the written word, Lisa Cron was (probably unintentionally) in the forefront of research currently being done by e-book publishers who are studying how many readers actually finish the best-sellers they have downloaded versus readers'' completion rate of other e-books.

Cron begins each chapter with two thought-provoking ideas. Examples:

" Cognitive Secret: The brain is wired to stubbornly resist change."
" Story Secret: Story is about change, which results from unavoidable conflict."

Worth reading.

Kim Burdick
Stanton, Delaware
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Hero on a journey
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
The 2nd book on writing I loved
Reviewed in the United States on January 23, 2020
The 1st book is Janet Burroway''s Writing Fiction (older editions only. The latest edition has been stripped of good things). Lisa Cron''s book is fantastic. Minor issue: she repeats a point here and there. Still, this book is awesome. 5 stars for sure. I just wish... See more
The 1st book is Janet Burroway''s Writing Fiction (older editions only. The latest edition has been stripped of good things).

Lisa Cron''s book is fantastic. Minor issue: she repeats a point here and there. Still, this book is awesome. 5 stars for sure. I just wish she wrote it in an international style as opposed to more of an American style. Because the book can then have an international appeal. But, hey, she wrote it and I thank her for that. It is a great instructional book.

Another thing is, I am a technical person with zero foundation in language, and therefore I like this book a lot. It separates the ability to tell a story from writing one. I think that part liberated me to be more confident about my craft.

I sincerely thank Ms. Cron for such a nice little, superbly researched volume.
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Top reviews from other countries

Rick Yagodich
1.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Vague and condescending…
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on March 30, 2019
A book on writing that is so vague in its own prose as to be more confusing than helpful. Abandoned at 15% While the underlying ideas have merit, they are poorly presented - probably because they could be clearly presented in about a dozen pages. Also, the repeated mantra...See more
A book on writing that is so vague in its own prose as to be more confusing than helpful. Abandoned at 15% While the underlying ideas have merit, they are poorly presented - probably because they could be clearly presented in about a dozen pages. Also, the repeated mantra that "most writers don''t know this" wears thin; yes, there are many who want to think of themselves as writers who don''t - all those who decide to knock out a novel without having studied the craft at all - but those are also the people who most likely wouldn''t read a book about writing…
10 people found this helpful
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Karen Tucker
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Absolutely fascinating - brilliant!
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on August 12, 2020
I was drawn to buy this book because I''m a writer and I want to learn how to write better. And because of its promise to show me what draws me to read stories, why I love the books I do, and how I can use my knowledge of myth and legend to better understand stories and why...See more
I was drawn to buy this book because I''m a writer and I want to learn how to write better. And because of its promise to show me what draws me to read stories, why I love the books I do, and how I can use my knowledge of myth and legend to better understand stories and why they''re important to us. This book fulfilled all those desires and more. I''ve read a lot of books about writing this year, in my quest to improve my writing skills, and I can honestly say that this has been the most fascinating of them all. Even if you don''t write and have no desire to write, this book is still worth reading. If you want to know why you love stories and what keeps you turning the pages, and coming back for more, read this book. If you want to understand the magic of story, read this book. If you want to improve your own writing skills, read this book. If you''re into psychology or myth and legend or anything that''s even vaguely related to stories, writing or what makes people tick, this book will fascinate you. Very definitely in my Top 5 of the many books I''ve read this year - fiction and non-fiction. I loved it. You will too.
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John R Hicks
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Based on neuro-science and books I have read
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on November 24, 2019
I am still reading but the questions asked have made me think more thoroughly.
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Mog
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Great book
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on October 1, 2015
This is a really good book for the budding writer. It makes so much sense and really makes you think about your story, characters and plot. I''d definitely recommend it for anyone who is hoping to write a novel.
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bookstar
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Just what I needed
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on March 22, 2019
This was just the book I needed in order to finish the novel, I was writing. It really explained how a story works. Highly recommendable.
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Wired new arrival for Story: The Writer's Guide to Using Brain Science to Hook Readers from the Very First popular Sentence sale

Wired new arrival for Story: The Writer's Guide to Using Brain Science to Hook Readers from the Very First popular Sentence sale

Wired new arrival for Story: The Writer's Guide to Using Brain Science to Hook Readers from the Very First popular Sentence sale

Wired new arrival for Story: The Writer's Guide to Using Brain Science to Hook Readers from the Very First popular Sentence sale

Wired new arrival for Story: The Writer's Guide to Using Brain Science to Hook Readers from the Very First popular Sentence sale

Wired new arrival for Story: The Writer's Guide to Using Brain Science to Hook Readers from the Very First popular Sentence sale

Wired new arrival for Story: The Writer's Guide to Using Brain Science to Hook Readers from the Very First popular Sentence sale

Wired new arrival for Story: The Writer's Guide to Using Brain Science to Hook Readers from the Very First popular Sentence sale

Wired new arrival for Story: The Writer's Guide to Using Brain Science to Hook Readers from the Very First popular Sentence sale

Wired new arrival for Story: The Writer's Guide to Using Brain Science to Hook Readers from the Very First popular Sentence sale

Wired new arrival for Story: The Writer's Guide to Using Brain Science to Hook Readers from the Very First popular Sentence sale

Wired new arrival for Story: The Writer's Guide to Using Brain Science to Hook Readers from the Very First popular Sentence sale

Wired new arrival for Story: The Writer's Guide to Using Brain Science to Hook Readers from the Very First popular Sentence sale

Wired new arrival for Story: The Writer's Guide to Using Brain Science to Hook Readers from the Very First popular Sentence sale

Wired new arrival for Story: The Writer's Guide to Using Brain Science to Hook Readers from the Very First popular Sentence sale

Wired new arrival for Story: The Writer's Guide to Using Brain Science to Hook Readers from the Very First popular Sentence sale

Wired new arrival for Story: The Writer's Guide to Using Brain Science to Hook Readers from the Very First popular Sentence sale

Wired new arrival for Story: The Writer's Guide to Using Brain Science to Hook Readers from the Very First popular Sentence sale