Training for the New Alpinism: high quality A Manual for discount the Climber as Athlete online sale

Training for the New Alpinism: high quality A Manual for discount the Climber as Athlete online sale

Training for the New Alpinism: high quality A Manual for discount the Climber as Athlete online sale
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In Training for the New Alpinism, Steve House, world-class climber and Patagonia ambassador, and Scott Johnston, coach of U.S. National Champions and World Cup Nordic Skiers, translate training theory into practice to allow you to coach yourself to any mountaineering goal.

Applying training practices from other endurance sports, House and Johnston demonstrate that following a carefully designed regimen is as effective for alpinism as it is for any other endurance sport and leads to better performance. They deliver detailed instruction on how to plan and execute training tailored to your individual circumstances.

Whether you work as a banker or a mountain guide, live in the city or the country, are an ice climber, a mountaineer heading to Denali, or a veteran of 8,000-meter peaks, your understanding of how to achieve your goals grows exponentially as you work with this book.

Chapters cover endurance and strength training theory and methodology, application and planning, nutrition, altitude, mental fitness, and assessing your goals and your strengths. Chapters are augmented with inspiring essays by world-renowned climbers, including Ueli Steck, Mark Twight, Peter Habeler, Voytek Kurtyka, and Will Gadd. Filled with photos, graphs, and illustrations.

Review

A must-have for anyone looking to optimize their time in the mountains—from guides throwing up new routes to weekend warriors getting into a new sport. coolhunting.com

The book''s easy-to-use format and scaleable training programs are accessible for anyone looking to improve their fitness through a new approach. coolhunting.com

About the Author

Steve House is a world renowned climber, mountain guide, and Patagonia Ambassador, widely regarded for his light-and-fast style. He has published articles in a number of periodicals, and he is the author of Beyond the Mountains (Patagonia Books, 2009). He lives in Ridgway, CO.
Scott Johnston, who grew up in Boulder, CO, has ski raced on a national and international level and is an avid climber. He currently coaches several of the nation''s top cross country skiers, and climbs, establishing local climbing routes in and around his home town of Mazama, WA, in the North Cascades, where he lives.
Mark Twight has applied the light-and-fast tactics he first developed in Europe to climbs ranging from the Himalayas to Alaska. Mark is the author of two books: Extreme Alpinism - Climbing Light, Fast and High and Kiss or Kill - Confessions of a Serial Climber. He is the founder of GymJones.

Excerpt. © Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved.

Introduction

The Old Becomes New Again

It was a close, warm, breezeless summer night,
Wan, dull, and glaring, with a dripping fog
Low-hung and thick that covered all the sky;
But, undiscouraged, we began to climb
The mountainside.
–William Wordsworth, “The Prelude” (1799–1805)

Physical exploration of the world was growing rapidly during the Romantic Period, the time of Wordsworth. Early mountaineers were upper class and well educated: poets, photographers, geologists, painters, and natural historians.
In 1895 the Englishman and alpinist Albert Mummery and four men undertook the first attempt to climb one of the Himalaya’s giant peaks, the 26,660-foot (8,126-meter) high Nanga Parbat. Mummery and two of his men lost their lives in an avalanche during the attempt. Thus climbing entered the twentieth century with artistic grace tainted by extreme tragedy; this began the greatest period of growth in alpinism, particularly in the Alps.
Technical standards rose rapidly. In 1906, 5.9 was first climbed in the Elbe Sandstone Mountains. Around this same time Austrian Paul Preuss trained himself to do one-armed pull-ups and climbed (and down climbed) alpine rock routes in the Dolomites to a modern grade of 5.8, solo and in hobnailed boots. By 1922 the top grade was 5.10d. Climbers of the time climbed many beautiful, difficult routes in the mountains. To modern climbers, they seem to have been driven by an innate curiosity to ascend, explore, and observe what would unfold in the process.
The great wars twisted everything; the conquest of the world’s fourteen highest peaks after World War II became surrogate battlegrounds to reinforce superiority, or symbolize rebirth, depending on whether your country had won or lost: Annapurna to the French, Everest to the British, Nanga Parbat to the Germans, K2 to the Italians. Ascent was transformed into conquest; summits became symbols of nationalistic pride. The climbing of mountains was changed forever. This ended symbolically in 1980 when Reinhold Messner was asked why he did not carry his country’s flag to the top of Everest, and he replied: “I did not go up for Italy, nor for South Tirol. I went up for myself.” Though his comment angered many at the time, the line was drawn.
In the information age all must be measured. For climbing, an emphasis on difficulty and speed emerged. Hardest, highest, fastest. In the age of social media all must be shared. The resulting cocktail of cameras, danger, and testosterone are all too often tragic. Rarely graceful.
The new alpinism comes full circle as small teams of fit, trained athletes emulate Mummery, aspire to Preuss, climb like the young Messner. Because those pioneers knew that alpinism—indeed all mindful pursuits—is at its most simple level, the sum of your daily choices and daily practices. Progress is entirely personal. The spirit of climbing does not lie in outcomes—lists, times, your conquests. You do keep those; you will always know which mountains you have climbed, which you have not. What you can climb is a manifestation of the current, temporary, state of your whole self. You can’t fake a sub-four-minute mile just as you can’t pretend to do an asana. Ascent too is an expression of many skills developed, refined, mastered.
Training is the most important vehicle for preparation. Constant practice begets examination and refinement of technique as well as fitness. It is not our natural tendency to value struggle over success, a worldview that climbing sternly enforces. Embracing struggle for its own sake is an important step on your path. Incremental vacillations in your self—your physical and mental selves—are exquisitely revealed in practicing ascent. There is no end to your progress or your process. For the two of us the pursuit of climbing mountains has been among the most powerful personal experiences we have known. Nothing else has come close to the blunt power of climbing to inform us about ourselves.
We don’t presume to tell anyone what the new alpinism will actually become; no one can know this. But we do think that we have earned the perspective to point in the right general direction: Structured, progressive training will be a big component, perhaps define, the future of alpine climbing. But not because it will help you climb harder, faster—though it will. Training prepares your body and, most important, your mind for ascent through consistent, hard, disciplined practice.
Go simply, train smart, climb well.

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4.8 out of 54.8 out of 5
472 global ratings

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Top reviews from the United States

C.Feldmann
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Lots of info to chew over. Get it long before you plan on doing a climb
Reviewed in the United States on February 16, 2019
Bought this book before attempting Mt. Shasta and Mt. Rainier. I have a bit of experience with hiking 14ers and a lot of experience backpacking multiple day trips. All the info in this book is great, and the explanations of why to train their way makes sense. Not just for... See more
Bought this book before attempting Mt. Shasta and Mt. Rainier. I have a bit of experience with hiking 14ers and a lot of experience backpacking multiple day trips. All the info in this book is great, and the explanations of why to train their way makes sense. Not just for climbing, there are a lot of specific exercises to do for climbing, but I think any long outdoor endurance sport can use the info in this book. Their approach is nice, especially for people like me, where I have a small amount of experience but most of the things in this book they discuss will really hammer home how important it is to train, not just exercise. For the last year(s) I''ve subscribed to the HIIT 4x4 type programs. This book doesn''t have much good to say about that approach. Their exercise plans are built on decades(or centuries) old methods that have worked for athletes way above my level and so should also work for me. Their exercise plans are very flexible and most of the effort to figuring out how much effort and time to put in is up to you, but that''s a Pro in my book, and after a good 7 months of training I''ll know how well the exercises worked. Will update the review at that time, after comparing to my comrades who are doing the "new" style of training.
11 people found this helpful
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J. Hooper
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
The Training Manual Mountaineers Needed
Reviewed in the United States on March 18, 2014
This is an outstanding, thorough, well done training manual for the mountaineer/alpinist. I''ve read it twice now, and it was even better the second time. It is not a "how to climb" book, that teaches you the knots, steps, and moves, or even a "climbing training" book, in... See more
This is an outstanding, thorough, well done training manual for the mountaineer/alpinist. I''ve read it twice now, and it was even better the second time. It is not a "how to climb" book, that teaches you the knots, steps, and moves, or even a "climbing training" book, in the sense of teaching how to do on-the-rock or on-the-ice training the local rock gym or crag. There are several superb books on those subjects (Gadd''s, Houston & Cosley''s, Horst''s, Long''s, Leubben''s, and more). House & Johnston is different: this book teaches you how to optimize your fitness for climbing, alpine climbing in particular, i.e., to put "more climber" behind the skills you have. The orientation is for both mountaineering and technical alpine projects - whether your goal is winter 14ers, classic alpine routes, Ruth Gorge classics, Andean or Himalayan giants, or anything within that general spectrum of casual outdoor recreation, this is your state of the art training Bible.
And Lord knows, they deliver the gospel and deliver it well. House and Johnston know their stuff, from the theoretical and biological underpinnings of fitness They dispatch the tired and too-often said "just go climbing" - no athlete interested in maximizing performance "just goes climbing/running/riding." It takes more. But "more" does not just mean more often, or harder, or longer. This book tells you what "more" means - it is a thorough explanation of what the physical demands of alpine climbing actually are, what the science tells us about the best ways to train those capacities, and how to put all that together into an executable program. What, when, how much, how often, how long, how heavy, how hard . . . ALL the information you need to get in the best conditions your genes and environment allow is all there. Their treatment of aerobic capacity - why it is so crucial for what we do, and how and how NOT to organize your training to improve it - is worth the price alone.
The book has many more real gems that you can put to use immediately: an "Alpine Combine," ala the famous NFL player evaluation combine,that serves as a handy means to assess and grade general fitness; a terrific, do-anywhere core sequence that lives up to its "Killer" name; weighted pullup, hill sprint, and loaded hiking cycles that are worth their weight in gold for the "bang for the buck" they deliver. Even the strength training information is stellar. I say "even," because, as a strength coach myself, I''m often disappointed or shaking my head at the mediocre, phoned-in strength prescriptions in most training-for-a-sport books. I shake it just as often at the currently popular "Crossfit" and its various knockoffs, all of which will make an unfit person much fitter, but all of which, at the same time, amount mostly to "working out to get better at our workouts," which is a far cry from working out to get better at climbing mountains. Not a deficiency here - the strength training information and advice in this book has a clear purpose (strengthen and toughen your musculoskeletal system to execute and withstand the demands of alpinism). House & Johnston lay out the stuff that works, the stuff that is relevant to our game, without cool but ultimately useless gym tricks. You don''t have to do Olympic squat snatches, muscle ups on rings, or anything else that would make you ask yourself "Why am I doing this again?" You will be box stepping, leg raising, pulling on tools, etc. - if you have ever climbed anything technical and hard, you will know exactly why you are doing what you are doing. House & Johnston include a very solid menu of general strength exercises, good, clear instructions for those exercises, and some atypical movements that are highly climbing specific. Their strength programming guidance - the loads, sets, and reps that produce specific kinds of strength or strength endurance - are dead solid perfect. No lazy "three sets of 15-20 reps" drivel: they understand, provide, and explain the full complement of strength work needed (depending on the phase of training or goal), including circuits for preparatory or work capacity development, max strength sessions, and strength endurance work - all useful, all of which must be trained in very different kinds of workouts.
Planning and programming information is similarly good, but has a distinct "major race" focus. House and Johnston are strong advocates for block periodization - spending sequential blocks of 2-5 months on specific components of fitness, leading to an overarching, major climb. The premise and prescribed approach is similar to, for example, the ideal training one would do for an Ironman, the Boston Marathon, or a championship meet in any similar sport - basically organizing the entire year toward one big audacious goal. That makes their specific planning prescriptions most suitable to climbers who build toward one or perhaps two major climbs or expeditions each year. If you are going to a big range for a bucket-list climb, this is exactly how to be in the best shape of your life for that trip - and why you need to begin that training about a year out. The book is less specific for one whose goal is closer to "high fitness year round." The authors point out, accurately, that it is impossible to be in your absolute best shape all the time - you have to build to that, and peak for it, and they show precisely how. But it would be a mistake to regard this book''s value as limited to "training for an expedition." The concepts and workouts can easily be modified and used, in my opinion, by people who are less oriented around some huge annual or semi-annual project, and instead need to stay at a high level of fitness for various climbs and tick lists over their summer rock, shoulder alpine, and winter ice seasons. The authors'' base and strength-endurance periods, for example, can be melded into an undulating periodization scheme that varies emphasis and exercise mode by the season, with transitions and 2-3 month builds toward the longer or more important climbs on the calendar. Some of us know how to do that, but I suspect others don''t, and I''d like to see House & Johnston in the second edition include at least a chapter for the climber who isn''t necessarily preparing for THE BIG CLIMB, but wants to stay in great shape over the course of a typical year and knock out a couple or three dozen significant alpine, ice or rock climbs during that year. Those folks, too, can be much fitter, and climb much better and more safely than if they "just go climbing" and practice random acts of exercise. Would love to see these authors comment on how they would organize the training of the avid weekend or twice-a-month alpinist across the seasons.
Climbers will also appreciate their solid, no-nonsense nutrition section, which provides solid guidance on performance eating during training and on climbs. What they say works, every time, as opposed to "diets with names," which are hit or miss at best, and may work for Jill but not for Jane, and many of which border on stupid for an alpine athlete.
Bottom line: Terrific book, well written, well organized, given the breadth of subject covered, and lavishly "iced" with relevant stories and sidebars from many of alpinism''s leading lights and superb action photos. If you train to climb mountains, especially big challenging ones, where superb conditioning is a necessity more than a luxury, buy this book.
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Amazon Customer
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Helpful for amateur alpinists too
Reviewed in the United States on September 26, 2016
I''ve been an amateur climber/mountaineer for 20 years now. I haven''t been as active over the last 10 years with career and family duties, but I''m slowly getting back into it. I''ve found that after a decade of significantly reduced activity that its very difficult to train... See more
I''ve been an amateur climber/mountaineer for 20 years now. I haven''t been as active over the last 10 years with career and family duties, but I''m slowly getting back into it. I''ve found that after a decade of significantly reduced activity that its very difficult to train without hurting myself. This book doesn''t really address this issue directly, but it gives a good overview of how to train in general so that you are alert and aware of the quality of your workouts so that you can make adjustments as necessary to prevent injury. It also gives you a realistic outlook on how long and gradual the training process really is. I can''t do what I did in my 20''s, which was basically train for a month, climb the mountain, and then let my body heal from all the damage I did in the process.

I''ve always wondered why some mountains went better than others. After reading this book it has become very clear to me what I did right training for certain mountains and what I''ve done wrong on others. It''s all about developing that aerobic base, but in this book it shows you how to really build that aerobic base far beyond anything I''ve done before by coupling the aerobic training with max strength training. I have not gotten to that part of the training program yet and I''m a little nervous about how my joints will hold up moving that type of strength training. The book definitely seems more catered to alpinists that are already in excellent shape.

I bought this book a couple months ago and am on week 6 now of my tranisition period. My one complaint about this book is the starting volume one should begin with in their transition period is poorly described. For example, I estimated I trained about 5 hours per week last year, which works out to about 260 hours. This is slightly above what they estimate for working professionals. In the transition period it is suggested that we divide our training volume by 2 to get the number of hours per week that we train during transition. That works out to 2.5 hours per week, which isn''t much. The strength training workouts last about 45 minutes for me and at twice a week that only leaves one hour for aerobic training, which is supposed to be where we''re spending the bulk of our time. I found a post on [...]
where someone asks this question. Scott Johnston answered the question and said that 2.5 hours was not very much and he was wondering why someone would need to exercise that little. He did say that if one were to exercise that little each week then you would not count your strength training sessions towards your training time each week. He did clarify that it''s very subjective what your initial training volume should be. However, the subjectivity here becomes so overwhelming that it is extremely difficult to determine a starting point. It would be helpful if there was a little more direction for the non-professional climber.

Overall though most of this book is excellent and will help assist the amateur climber to accomplish things that they once thought were only attainable when they were younger and missed the boat. For someone pushing 40 I find this book to be very encouraging as I now feel there is a way to train where my chances of getting injured are minimized. I would highly recommend this book to anyone I know that is serious about alpinism.
14 people found this helpful
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charles
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
The Ultimate knowledge and metrics of What to Know and Do to maximize you focus and procurement to be a climber
Reviewed in the United States on May 29, 2018
This is the Bible and Docterine of What to Know and Do for anyone that aspires to undertake endurance training and health. Particularly if your interests are in mountaineering, rock climbing, or strength training. The information is fundemenfatal, specific and scalable to... See more
This is the Bible and Docterine of What to Know and Do for anyone that aspires to undertake endurance training and health. Particularly if your interests are in mountaineering, rock climbing, or strength training. The information is fundemenfatal, specific and scalable to all-regardless of their individual goals and ideas. Unlike many books on climbing, this text does not try to be philosophical or mental, it focuses on truth and science and gives you constructive guidelines, techniques and measurements on how you can acquire your ambition, or find what you ambitions truly are. I have both the paper and electronic version.
One person found this helpful
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arielle
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A must read for mountain athletes
Reviewed in the United States on April 30, 2019
Having used their guidelines and programming personally (to great results) and also working as a guide I''ve had clients who have used this book be significantly more prepared than others on various trips (Rainier, Denali), I would highly recommend this to anyone who... See more
Having used their guidelines and programming personally (to great results) and also working as a guide I''ve had clients who have used this book be significantly more prepared than others on various trips (Rainier, Denali), I would highly recommend this to anyone who recreates in the mountains. Not only great scientific/biological info on the "why" but plenty of guidelines and examples to help you put your new understanding of training for these kinds of endeavors into a concrete training plan.
2 people found this helpful
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M. R.
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Amazing book for advanced athletes
Reviewed in the United States on June 25, 2015
Great book - with a good combinations of technical advice and anecdotes from some of the masters in the field, the book is detailed, interesting, and moves quickly. One thing to note however is that this is clearly a book for already advanced athletes who are trying to move... See more
Great book - with a good combinations of technical advice and anecdotes from some of the masters in the field, the book is detailed, interesting, and moves quickly. One thing to note however is that this is clearly a book for already advanced athletes who are trying to move to a higher level. For someone who is just starting to get into climbing or who is just starting to take conditioning seriously, this book is going to be helpful for giving a general idea about what it means to be fit for alpine climbing, but most of the advice and detailed plans in the book are not going to be immediately applicable. The book is best suited to someone who has some experience in the field, is already regularly training, and wants to take their training to the next level.
4 people found this helpful
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jfp
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
The new classic
Reviewed in the United States on May 1, 2014
This book brings the latest sport science into alpine climbing. Such books abound in the realm of more traditional sports, such as cycling or running, but strangely enough principled training is barely the norm in mountaineering. I always felt I could get much better advice... See more
This book brings the latest sport science into alpine climbing. Such books abound in the realm of more traditional sports, such as cycling or running, but strangely enough principled training is barely the norm in mountaineering. I always felt I could get much better advice to prepare my body in a more efficient way for my climbing practice. I was waiting for such a book for years. Scott Johnson was coaching the renowned climber Steve House for many years, and they explain in great detail their experiences. I used to focus on "training spreadsheets" from other books, and eventually overtrained and injured myself, because spreadsheets completely ignore how your body reacts to the training stress and recovers. The level of detail provided in this book allows to understand much better why you train, and how to adjust training load so that the impact on climbing is maximized. The contribution of Mark Twight and other world-class climbers (e.g. Ueli Steck) adds a lot of credibility as well.

In summary, there is no climbing technique per se in this book. The focus is essentially on how to physically prepare for any alpine climbing objective at a multi-year level, and integrates the climbing in the whole plan, while using proven training methodology from similar sports and the experience of some of the world''s top climbers.

As a bonus, the photographs are gorgeous. I have countless training book at home about multiple sports. Quite honestly, this is the most exciting and motivating book I read for years. I highly recommend it to anybody interested even remotely in alpine sports.
3 people found this helpful
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Devin Fitzgerald
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Good resource for training
Reviewed in the United States on June 20, 2017
A good book on the fundamentals of training for climbing. The book is well thought out and written in a format that is easy to understand. The author makes a point about training for general fitness and then also climbing specific training. This book gives more general... See more
A good book on the fundamentals of training for climbing. The book is well thought out and written in a format that is easy to understand. The author makes a point about training for general fitness and then also climbing specific training. This book gives more general guidelines for training as apposed to "do x sets for Y reps" etc. It does lack some specificity in that regard but it makes it better able to make a training program that works with you and your schedule. I would recommend for anyone wanting some guidance on training for all types of climbing
2 people found this helpful
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Top reviews from other countries

TJ
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
It''s very rare to find such a complete, comprehensive guide which is well written
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on December 17, 2018
This is a wonderful guide to using your body as a tool to alpine achievements. I like the following factors about this book: 1. There are beautiful, full page pictures throughout the book which make the book much more interesting, and also adds some inspiration. Helps you...See more
This is a wonderful guide to using your body as a tool to alpine achievements. I like the following factors about this book: 1. There are beautiful, full page pictures throughout the book which make the book much more interesting, and also adds some inspiration. Helps you remember why you are reading the book in the first place. 2. There is plenty of description - It''s not just a manual more of an argument for an entirely new way of viewing training for mountaineering. It''s not light on description at all - and has been contributed to by some expert mountaineers. 3. The actual training bits are very easy to find and to follow - has helped me to structure my approach a lot. I think my only (very) slight irritations are as follow: 1. As a scientist myself, I think certain effects are presented as a fact, where the reality is that they have shown some correlation in very small sample studies. 2. Perhaps sometimes there is a little too much opinion. But that''s just my opinion! Nothing in there to knock a star off - sure to be an invaluable resource to beginners and more experienced climbers looking to re-calibrate their approach.
8 people found this helpful
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Nilay Kamdar
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Fantastic Book - Excellent source of information
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on March 30, 2019
This book, compared to general books I buy is expensive. But it is well worth every penny I paid - perhaps more. It is a fantastic resource that contextualises all the information that is out there and provides a concise source of information that is very easy to read,...See more
This book, compared to general books I buy is expensive. But it is well worth every penny I paid - perhaps more. It is a fantastic resource that contextualises all the information that is out there and provides a concise source of information that is very easy to read, absorb and understand. The book is designed for the mountaineer, but the principles that you learn from it can be applied to any sport or activity. I cannot praise this book enough as a source of information. If you are serious mountaineering - and are in two minds about whether to buy this then you might as well be in two minds about mountaineering - this is an invaluable resource that has helped me over the years.
2 people found this helpful
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Michael
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
This book has changed my life
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on February 13, 2019
Well, it''s at least changed my training. I thought I knew a lot about fitness-- it turns out, I know absolutely nothing. This book is exceptionally thorough and engaging-- it''s 450 pages and I finished it in one weekend. I''m now diligently following the recommended training...See more
Well, it''s at least changed my training. I thought I knew a lot about fitness-- it turns out, I know absolutely nothing. This book is exceptionally thorough and engaging-- it''s 450 pages and I finished it in one weekend. I''m now diligently following the recommended training plan. I resisted getting this book for a long time, and I really wish I had bought it earlier!
3 people found this helpful
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P Taylor
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Very comprehensive and detailed while easy to follow
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on January 31, 2021
I previously used Mark Twight''s book in ''99 to guide my training, this is even better, I have read and re-read this book and using the training log that can be ordered separately my training in this lockdown world is making a real difference. I have been plagued by small...See more
I previously used Mark Twight''s book in ''99 to guide my training, this is even better, I have read and re-read this book and using the training log that can be ordered separately my training in this lockdown world is making a real difference. I have been plagued by small constant injuries in training over the last few years, probably from going too hard too quick, this guide emphasises gradual, so much so that it penetrated my thick skull and the message got in there. Gives good advice for adapting the training if you don''t live near mountains, which is useful for some, me included. Nice examples throughout from various athletes and alpinists of their experiences. Thoroughly recommended.
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Kermitz
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Follow the science
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on January 4, 2021
Fantastic book that explains what happens within your cells and organism when you train, depending on how you train. I''ve been on a plateau for years, not seeing any improvements in my performance. With just the first chapters and 3 weeks of modified training, I already see...See more
Fantastic book that explains what happens within your cells and organism when you train, depending on how you train. I''ve been on a plateau for years, not seeing any improvements in my performance. With just the first chapters and 3 weeks of modified training, I already see clear results. Fantastic. The advice on this book is targeted for climbing but most is applicable to any endurance sport: marathon running, cycling, etc.
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Training for the New Alpinism: high quality A Manual for discount the Climber as Athlete online sale

Training for the New Alpinism: high quality A Manual for discount the Climber as Athlete online sale

Training for the New Alpinism: high quality A Manual for discount the Climber as Athlete online sale

Training for the New Alpinism: high quality A Manual for discount the Climber as Athlete online sale

Training for the New Alpinism: high quality A Manual for discount the Climber as Athlete online sale

Training for the New Alpinism: high quality A Manual for discount the Climber as Athlete online sale

Training for the New Alpinism: high quality A Manual for discount the Climber as Athlete online sale

Training for the New Alpinism: high quality A Manual for discount the Climber as Athlete online sale

Training for the New Alpinism: high quality A Manual for discount the Climber as Athlete online sale

Training for the New Alpinism: high quality A Manual for discount the Climber as Athlete online sale

Training for the New Alpinism: high quality A Manual for discount the Climber as Athlete online sale

Training for the New Alpinism: high quality A Manual for discount the Climber as Athlete online sale

Training for the New Alpinism: high quality A Manual for discount the Climber as Athlete online sale

Training for the New Alpinism: high quality A Manual for discount the Climber as Athlete online sale

Training for the New Alpinism: high quality A Manual for discount the Climber as Athlete online sale

Training for the New Alpinism: high quality A Manual for discount the Climber as Athlete online sale

Training for the New Alpinism: high quality A Manual for discount the Climber as Athlete online sale

Training for the New Alpinism: high quality A Manual for discount the Climber as Athlete online sale

Training for the New Alpinism: high quality A Manual for discount the Climber as Athlete online sale

Training for the New Alpinism: high quality A Manual for discount the Climber as Athlete online sale

Training for the New Alpinism: high quality A Manual for discount the Climber as Athlete online sale

Training for the New Alpinism: high quality A Manual for discount the Climber as Athlete online sale

Training for the New Alpinism: high quality A Manual for discount the Climber as Athlete online sale

Training for the New Alpinism: high quality A Manual for discount the Climber as Athlete online sale

Training for the New Alpinism: high quality A Manual for discount the Climber as Athlete online sale

Training for the New Alpinism: high quality A Manual for discount the Climber as Athlete online sale