Master discount & wholesale Apprentice (Star Wars) online sale

Master discount & wholesale Apprentice (Star Wars) online sale

Master discount & wholesale Apprentice (Star Wars) online sale

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Product Description

NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER • An unexpected offer threatens the bond between Qui-Gon Jinn and Obi-Wan Kenobi as the two Jedi navigate a dangerous new planet and an uncertain future in the first canon Star Wars novel to take place before the events of Star Wars: The Phantom Menace.

A Jedi must be a fearless warrior, a guardian of justice, and a scholar in the ways of the Force. But perhaps a Jedi’s most essential duty is to pass on what they have learned. Master Yoda trained Dooku; Dooku trained Qui-Gon Jinn; and now Qui-Gon has a Padawan of his own. But while Qui-Gon has faced all manner of threats and danger as a Jedi, nothing has ever scared him like the thought of failing his apprentice.

Obi-Wan Kenobi has deep respect for his Master, but struggles to understand him. Why must Qui-Gon so often disregard the laws that bind the Jedi? Why is Qui-Gon drawn to ancient Jedi prophecies instead of more practical concerns? And why wasn’t Obi-Wan told that Qui-Gon is considering an invitation to join the Jedi Council—knowing it would mean the end of their partnership? The simple answer scares him: Obi-Wan has failed his Master.

When Jedi Rael Averross, another former student of Dooku, requests their assistance with a political dispute, Jinn and Kenobi travel to the royal court of Pijal for what may be their final mission together. What should be a simple assignment quickly becomes clouded by deceit, and by visions of violent disaster that take hold in Qui-Gon’s mind. As Qui-Gon’s faith in prophecy grows, Obi-Wan’s faith in him is tested—just as a threat surfaces that will demand that Master and apprentice come together as never before, or be divided forever.

Review

“Gray''s other Star Wars novels— Lost Stars, Bloodline and Leia: Princess of Alderaan—are among the best you can read, but Master & Apprentice stands out as her strongest.”— CNET
 
“Thankfully, the novel absolutely delivers on the goods and the wait has been worth it.”— Cinelinx
 
Master & Apprentice proves—again—that Claudia Gray ‘gets’ Star Wars.”— Dork Side of the Force
 
“Gray has not only written her finest novel to date in my opinion, but certainly one of the finest canon novels as well, maybe the finest.”— TheForce.Net

About the Author

Claudia Gray is the author of Star Wars: Bloodline; Star Wars: Leia, Princess of Alderaan; and Star Wars: Lost Stars. Her other books include Defy the Stars and the Evernight, Spellcaster, and Firebrand series. She has worked as a lawyer, a journalist, a disc jockey, and a particularly ineffective waitress. Her lifelong interests include old houses, classic movies, vintage style, and history. She lives in New Orleans.

Excerpt. © Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved.

As ever, after a mission, Qui-Gon had been summoned to the Jedi Council’s chambers for his report. It was nighttime—later than the Council usually met, at least for ordinary business—and the darkness around them was illuminated by the cyclone of Coruscanti traffic and ships’ lights. Yet here, within this room, a sense of serenity prevailed. Qui-Gon relished the contrast.

Master Billaba leaned forward, studying her datapad with a frown on her face. “It worries me, this misunderstanding between you and your Padawan. This isn’t the first time you’ve reported such difficulties.”
Qui-Gon bowed his head slightly. “It worries me as well. Obi-Wan is strong in the Force, and eager to do his duty. The failure must be mine. Fundamentally, I fear, we are a mismatch. I’ve been unable to adapt my teaching methods to his needs, despite my best efforts.”

Yoda cocked his head. “Adapt he must as well. Cooperation is learned not through individual effort. Only together can you progress.”

Agreeing to that proposition—sensible though it was—would mean shifting some of the blame onto Obi-Wan, which Qui-Gon preferred not to do. He simply remained quiet. The Jedi Council had a habit of assuming that silence equaled agreement; Qui-Gon had found this habit useful, from time to time.

Regardless, he expected the Council to eventually ask him if he wanted them to reassign Obi-Wan’s training to another Master. He’d known before this meeting began that they might even ask the ques­tion tonight, but he still wasn’t sure what he would say. The suspense seemed worse than he would’ve anticipated, maybe because he didn’t know what he wanted to answer . . .

. . . or because the silence in the room had lasted a suspiciously long period of time.

Qui-Gon focused his attention back on the Masters surrounding him. They were exchanging glances in what seemed to be anticipation. He straightened. “Have you another mission for us?” Maybe they in­tended to test him and Obi-Wan one more time before any decision about reassignment would be made.

“Yes, another task for you we have.” Yoda’s ears lowered, a sign of deep intent. “Consider it carefully, you must.”

Mace Windu drew himself upright and folded his hands together in a formal gesture of respect. “You may not have heard that Master Dapatian intends to retire from the Council, effective next month.”

Qui-Gon glanced at Poli Dapatian, a Master of great renown . . . so much so that Qui-Gon had failed to note, in recent years, how aged he had become. “That is our loss.”

“We hope it will also be our gain,” Mace replied. “Qui-Gon Jinn, we hereby offer you a seat on the Jedi Council.”

Had he misheard? No, he hadn’t. Qui-Gon slowly gazed around the circle, taking in the expressions of each Council member in turn. Some of them looked amused, others pleased. A few of them, Yoda included, appeared more rueful than not. But they were serious.

“I admit—you’ve surprised me,” Qui-Gon finally said.

“I imagine so,” Mace said drily. “A few years ago, we would’ve been astonished to learn we would ever consider this. But in the time since, we’ve all changed. We’ve grown. Which means the possibilities have changed as well.”

Qui-Gon took a moment to collect himself. Without any warning, one of the turning points of his life had arrived. Everything he said and did in the next days would be of great consequence. “You’ve argued with my methods often as not, or perhaps you’d say I’ve argued with yours.”

“Truth, this is,” Yoda said.

Depa Billaba gave Yoda a look Qui-Gon couldn’t interpret. “It’s also true that the Jedi Council needs more perspectives.”

Is the Council actually making sense? Qui-Gon hoped none of them had picked up on that thought.

Mace nodded. “Yes, Qui-Gon, we’ve disagreed often. Butted heads, even. But you’ve always acted with respect for the Council’s authority, without compromising your inner convictions. This shows a great gift for—”

“Diplomacy?” Qui-Gon asked.

Mace replied, “I was going to say balance.

It was a delicate line to walk, one Qui-Gon had stumbled over on many occasions. But those occasions had become rarer as the years went on. He’d learned how to handle the Council well enough. Now, it seemed, the Council had become ready to hear him in return.

Qui-Gon had never imagined sitting on the Jedi Council itself, at least not since he was a youngling. Dooku had chuckled once, early in Qui-Gon’s training, when they spoke of the Council. “You have your own mind, my Padawan,” he’d said. “The Council doesn’t always re­spond well to that.” Given how many times Qui-Gon had clashed with the Council—from his earliest days as a Jedi Knight up to six weeks ago—he’d always assumed that he would never ascend to the heights of the Order.

But now it could happen. Would happen. He’d be able to weigh in on the Council’s decisions, and perhaps create some of the change he wanted to see. It was the greatest opportunity of his life.

“You honor me,” Qui-Gon said. “I ask for some time to meditate upon this before I accept.” Of course he would take the seat on the Council. But in doing so, he wanted to more fully reflect upon how this would change him, and the breadth of the important role he would assume.

“Very wise,” said Depa. “Most of those asked to join the Council do the same, myself included. If someone didn’t—well, I’d think maybe he didn’t know what he was getting into.”

Laughter went around the room. Amusement bubbled within Poli Dapatian’s respirator mask. Depa Billaba’s grin was infectious, and Qui-Gon realized he was smiling back at her. Although the Council had never been hostile to him, this was the first time Qui-Gon had felt a deeper camaraderie—the friendliness of equals. Already Teth and the Hutts seemed like a problem from years ago. The future shone so boldly that it threatened to eclipse the present.

Steady, he told himself. Even an invitation to the Jedi Council mustn’t go to your head.

“Consider carefully, you must,” said Yoda, the only member of the Council who remained gravely serious. “No hasty answer should you give.”

“Of course,” Qui-Gon said. Hadn’t he just indicated that he in­tended to do exactly that?

Before he could think more on it, Mace said, “In some ways, this invitation comes at an opportune time. This change could, potentially, resolve other problems.”

Only then did it hit Qui-Gon: If he took a seat on the Council, then Obi-Wan would be transferred to another Master.

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4.7 out of 54.7 out of 5
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Top reviews from the United States

fanboy3712
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
This is the Star Wars you were looking for!
Reviewed in the United States on April 16, 2019
I started to tear up reading the quote from Qui-Gon on the back. Star Wars has always done this to me, but there''s something magical here. It has been 20 years since Phantom Menace. That was the first SW movie I saw in theaters that wasn''t the special editions of the... See more
I started to tear up reading the quote from Qui-Gon on the back. Star Wars has always done this to me, but there''s something magical here. It has been 20 years since Phantom Menace. That was the first SW movie I saw in theaters that wasn''t the special editions of the original trilogy. I''m a child of the prequels and Clone Wars. There is no doubt you''ll enjoy this if you are too! Everyone should enjoy this Master/apprentice dynamic that we simply didn''t get enough of in the movie. I was beyond thrilled every second I was reading this mostly because it was from a mostly untouched time set before Phantom Menace.
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Jeditear
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Another outstanding book by Claudia Gray!!!
Reviewed in the United States on April 18, 2019
As someone who gobbled up all the old Star Wars books that have now passed into Legend... it seems to me that there has never been a better time to travel to the Galaxy far, far away. I read this book in two days, a new record for me. Gray, somehow,... See more
As someone who gobbled up all the old Star Wars books that have now passed into Legend... it seems to me that there has never been a better time to travel to the Galaxy far, far away.

I read this book in two days, a new record for me.

Gray, somehow, just seems to get Star Wars... at least what is most important to me about Star Wars... which is heart, specifically the mystery of the heart and of the universe.

The characters are great, the situations on the large scale and small scale are all understandable and believable, the psychologies and philosophies are likewise well written and have weight. No straw men here.

Please please please Claudia... you GET the turmoil and difficulties of striving to do the right thing along with the dangers of attempting to grasp at control to make sure it’s done. The humility that you write into the character of Qui-Gon, seems simply the way George Lucas envisioned him to be.... and gave me something I never knew I wanted... to know Qui-Gon MORE.
Please please please... if at all possible... write more books about the Jedi...

I believe that the Force wills it. ☺️
85 people found this helpful
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RDDTop Contributor: Batman
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A Great Addition to the New Star Wars Canon!
Reviewed in the United States on April 21, 2019
Claudia Gray’s “Master and Apprentice” begins with the troubled apprenticeship between Qui-Gon Jinn and Obi-Wan Kenobi. Obi-Wan struggles to adapt to Qui-Gon’s unique interpretation of Jedi rules and his unorthodox approach to problems. Qui-Gon can see the bright future his... See more
Claudia Gray’s “Master and Apprentice” begins with the troubled apprenticeship between Qui-Gon Jinn and Obi-Wan Kenobi. Obi-Wan struggles to adapt to Qui-Gon’s unique interpretation of Jedi rules and his unorthodox approach to problems. Qui-Gon can see the bright future his apprentice will have, but doesn’t feel that he’s the best teacher. When the Jedi Council offers Qui-Gon a position on the council, the possibility that Qui-Gon will transfer Obi-Wan to another master for training so he may accept the offer further strains their partnership. Before Qui-Gon can make a decision, however, the two must travel to Pijal, where the reclusive government is about to undergo sweeping changes as the Czerka Corporation opens a hyperspace corridor nearby. Since the princess is only 14, the Jedi Rael Averross has been acting as the regent due to his neutrality for the last eight years following the tragic death of his padawan. Recent terrorist attacks threaten the forthcoming change from an absolute to constitutional monarchy as well as the construction of infrastructure for the hyperspace corridor, so the Pijali government requests an investigation by the Jedi. Averross apprenticed with Count Dooku prior to Qui-Gon and personally vouches for him to lead the investigation.

In exploring Qui-Gon’s unorthodox methods, Gray focuses on his fascination with Jedi prophecy. The discovery of a fool’s gold type of kyber crystal evokes one of these prophecies: “When the kyber that is not kyber shines forth, the time of prophecy will be at hand” (pg. 117). Other prophecies run through the novel, such as “she who was born to darkness will give birth to darkness” (pg. 229), possibly a reference to Leia and Ben Solo, as well as “he who learns to conquer death will through his greatest student live again” (pg. 288), which may refer to Emperor Palpatine’s forthcoming return in “Star Wars Episode IX: The Rise of Skywalker.” Quoting one of Qui-Gon’s aphorisms, Obi-Wan says, “People are more than their worst act” (pg. 116), contributing to the belief in redemption that runs as a throughline in the “Star Wars” saga. The story further helps to explore themes from “The Phantom Menace” as the Czerka Corporation relies on slave labor, somehow skirting the laws of the Republic and establishing Qui-Gon’s feeling that the Jedi Council, in obeying its mandate of nonintervention, has allowed evil to flourish at the margins of society (pg. 212). Qui-Gon enlists the help of Rahara Wick, a formerly enslaved person turned jewel smuggler, to help him search for the Pijali Opposition unnoticed. Both Rahara’s experience and Czerka’s attempts to codify slavery as a punishment for most crimes on Pijal (pg. 188) help to show the corruption and moral lapses in the twilight of the Republic.

Previous authors have examined Obi-Wan Kenobi’s apprenticeship with Qui-Gon Jinn, in particular Dave Wolverton and Jude Watson in the “Jedi Apprentice” series, though this is the first novel in the new “Star Wars” canon to examine the period prior to “Star Wars Episode I: The Phantom Menace.” In helping to link the prequel-era stories together, Gray not only includes the references to kyber crystals and Jedi prophecy, she also includes flashbacks to Qui-Gon’s apprenticeship with Dooku and shows Obi-Wan learning to ride a veractyl, one of the creatures he rode in “Revenge of the Sith” (pg. 151), and reflecting on the Guardians of the Whills in a reference to “Rogue One” (pg. 243). The idea of a Jedi acting as planetary regent as well as the characterization of Averross recalls some of the best elements of the 1990s Bantam “Star Wars” novels, like Corran Horn. Gray previous wrote three of the best character studies in the new “Star Wars” canon – “Lost Stars,” “Bloodline,” and “Leia: Princess of Alderaan” – and this is more of the style fans expect of her. A great addition to the new “Star Wars” canon.
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Area Five
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Excellent, a Must-Read.
Reviewed in the United States on April 20, 2019
I''ve been very much looking forward to this, having greatly enjoyed the author''s previous Star Wars offerings. That having been said, this is arguably her best work in the Star Wars universe thus far. Most impressive to me is how she perfectly captures Qui-Gon and Obi-wan''s... See more
I''ve been very much looking forward to this, having greatly enjoyed the author''s previous Star Wars offerings. That having been said, this is arguably her best work in the Star Wars universe thus far. Most impressive to me is how she perfectly captures Qui-Gon and Obi-wan''s (and Dooku in his brief appearances) manner of speaking and even mannerisms. It is clear that she has spent a great deal of time researching this material. This book is by no means, however, a return to the prequel era simply for the sake of doing so. It greatly expands one''s understanding of Qui-Gon and Obi-wan''s relationship and greatly expands our knowledge of the Jedi prophecies, in addition to delivering an engrossing and enjoyable story. Master & Apprentice is simply a delight to read.
23 people found this helpful
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BrandonTop Contributor: Star Wars
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Decent look at Qui-Gon and Obi-Wan, light on action. Not much new here
Reviewed in the United States on June 25, 2019
This book seems to have a primary purpose of showcasing Qui-Gon and Obi-Wan and outline how their decisions help back into the events of Phantom Menace. As a result it doesnt have much of an interesting plot on it''s own. The action is light as well which makes for a tough... See more
This book seems to have a primary purpose of showcasing Qui-Gon and Obi-Wan and outline how their decisions help back into the events of Phantom Menace. As a result it doesnt have much of an interesting plot on it''s own. The action is light as well which makes for a tough read overall. Things pick up in the back half of book as a classic whodunit unfolds.

Overall I found this to be a bland book. If you love Qui-Gon then this is a must read but mostly because he seldom stars in ANY book.

The good:
Good Dooku, Yoda and other Jedi moments.
Explains the background of how Qui-Gon is not already being on the council for Phantom Menace.
Explains Qui-Gon''s obsession with the prophecies.
Whodunit.
Introduces a few interesting characters including a disillusioned Jedi.
Shield that guards against the Jedi attacks.
The use of crystals is clever.

The bad:
Way too light on the action.
Reuse: A teenage Queen guided by a bunch of bureaucratic staff like a security guy, regional governor, trusted adviser. (hello Phantom Menace).
Reuse: Corporate invasion (Phantom Menace)
Reuse: More slavery. Too many Star Wars movies have gone into this territory. It''s unoriginal and predictable.
Obi-Wan and Qui-Gon not getting along (Attack of the Clones) and this felt so forced.
Obi-Wan being painted as a rule follower seems out of place given how young he is.
The use of the phrase "getting laid" is completely out of place in Star Wars. Not so much because it''s crude but because it''s modern day slang. There are other examples of this in the novel but this one stood out.

I liked the book but didnt love it. I happen to love Qui-Gon so it is possible that I read this again. However, this book falls easily outside of my top 25 Star Wars books so it can''t get more than a 3 star review.
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Dennis Keithly
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Exploring a Mentorship in Star Wars
Reviewed in the United States on April 19, 2019
Master and Apprentice is the latest in a line of good Star Wars books by Claudia Gray. Readers familiar with her work will easily recognize her voice. This book isn’t just about Qui-gin and Obi-Wan. It is about many masters and apprentices. This novel features a... See more
Master and Apprentice is the latest in a line of good Star Wars books by Claudia Gray. Readers familiar with her work will easily recognize her voice. This book isn’t just about Qui-gin and Obi-Wan. It is about many masters and apprentices.

This novel features a world new to Star Wars that is on the verge or crowning a new queen, signing a treaty, and opening a hyperspace lane that will unite it with the rest of the galaxy. However, a greedy corporation influences everything and an opposition movement appears to have adopted terrorist tactics. That is when Qui-Gon and Obi-Wan are sent by the Jedi to intervene.

The two Jedi don’t get along all that well. They have different ideals and don’t understand each other. Each wants more from the other and more from themselves. Master and Apprentice explores their evolving relationship as they navigate success and setbacks.

Star Wars fans should enjoy this book. There are plenty of new and recognizable characters to keep it interesting. There are elements that seem to spring directly from The Phantom Menace (taxation, ineffective galactic politics, corporations, etc.), but new elements and twists that keep it fresh. There is plenty of action from the Jedi to go around as well.
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Darth DragonettiTop Contributor: Star Wars
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Amongst the Best in SW Fiction
Reviewed in the United States on May 5, 2019
Star Wars: Master and Apprentice is a 2019 novel by Claudia Gray. It is part of the new canon, and is set prior to The Phantom Menace, the first book in the new canon set during this time period. As its cover and title imply, Master and Apprentice focuses heavily... See more
Star Wars: Master and Apprentice is a 2019 novel by Claudia Gray. It is part of the new canon, and is set prior to The Phantom Menace, the first book in the new canon set during this time period.

As its cover and title imply, Master and Apprentice focuses heavily on the relationship between Qui-Gon Jinn and Obi-Wan Kenobi. After an old friend and fellow Jedi Knight requests assistance with a political dispute, Qui-Gon and Obi-Wan are off to the planet of Pijal to assist however they can. When master and apprentice arrive, they find the delicate situation is more complicated and disturbing than either had been led to believe. In addition, Qui-Gon Jinn begins to experience cryptic visions that bespeak future violence, visions that Obi-Wan is skeptical of. As Qui-Gon and Obi-Wan navigate the deceitful and dangerous web of Pijal''s royal court, their relationship is strained like never before. Will master and apprentice be able to unravel the mystery while maintaining the integrity of the their relationship?

Master and Apprentice brings to mind such classic pre-Phantom Menace novels as Cloak of Deception or Darth Plagueis, and it is a worthy addition to these other novels. Qui-Gon Jinn (and Count Dooku, for that matter) were criminally under-explored in the films, so I am most excited to see more light shed on these characters. And what a great job Claudia Gray does of it! Characterization is certainly the highlight of the book. The dynamic relationship between Qui-Gon and Obi-Wan is rendered beautifully, as are their individual characters. Gray nails the characters in terms of how they think, act, and speak, and it is a real pleasure to spend time with these folks and get to know them better. There are also some dynamite flashback sequences involving Count Dooku and Qui-Gon that help develop both characters in interesting ways.

Beyond characterization, the story is also quite good. It moves at a good clip, and has enough twists and turns to keep you interested. The world-building and creation of the unique culture on Pijal are a testament to the author''s strong ability to write effective science fiction, and not just a good Star Wars story. The author also dives into the lore of the Jedi, giving the novel a real sense of depth. The quality of writing is high, and I am so glad the author didn''t write the novel with the childish tone found in many of the new canon novels.

Though excellent, I did find a couple of things in Master and Apprentice that did not thrill me. Firstly, I don''t know that Pax and Rahara were needed in the story. Claudia Gray builds them into good characters, but in the end they just serve to take away from other characters we would rather spend more time with. Secondly, I was rather surprised by the amount of cursing in the novel. Though mild, I don''t believe it was necessary. The very mild sexual innuendos were also a little surprising. Other than these, my complaints were few.

Master and Apprentice should not be missed. It is among the best Star Wars novels I have read, both in new and old canons. It is very encouraging to see that great science fiction still comes out under the Star Wars label, and I sincerely hope it becomes a trend.
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Paul C
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
One of the best SW Novels I''ve ever read...
Reviewed in the United States on May 20, 2019
First off: this is one of the best Star Wars books I have ever read… and I have gone through dozens and dozens. After a quick and hairy escape from an angry Hutt, Qui-Gon and Obi-Wan head back to Coruscant to await a new mission from the Jedi council. Each spends... See more
First off: this is one of the best Star Wars books I have ever read… and I have gone through dozens and dozens.

After a quick and hairy escape from an angry Hutt, Qui-Gon and Obi-Wan head back to Coruscant to await a new mission from the Jedi council. Each spends a bit of time contemplating the nature of their relationship. They are an odd couple: Obi-Wan is looking for clear succinct answers and Qui-Gon has a tendency to be obtuse and cryptic.

Two actions occur quickly in succession: Qui-Gon is offered a seat on the Jedi Council and the pair is immediately given a mission to help a planet in the midst of dangerous terrorist attacks. Two things are causing friction on the planet of Pijal. They are close to a change of government from a monarchy to a representative democracy and they are about to open of a new hyperspace lane that will connect them more readily to the greater galaxy. The pair of Jedi enter these conflicts with the future of their partnership at risk if Qui-Gon joins the council. This knowledge hangs over their heads as they try to find a way to help this world to a peaceful resolution.

Yes. This is a book about a Jedi mission in the days of The Republic. But at its core, Master & Apprentice focuses on the line of Jedis, from Dooku to Qui-Gon to Obi-Won and the Skywalkers. The nature of the relationship between teacher and student is explored like no other Star Wars book I have read. Gray introduces a controversial new Jedi named Rael Averross, who was given the position of regent on Pijal after an incident with his padawan and incidentally, he was Dooku’s apprentice before Qui-Gon. Besides a few episodes of Clone Wars and some scenes in the Prequels, I don’t know much about Dooku’s character, yet this book elevates him to a Jedi who had a lot to offer his apprentices before he turned to The Dark Side.

The mission is filled with palace intrigue, a great mystery to solve, and several unforeseeable twists. The Jedis have to wade through several moral ambiguities; they continually ask the questions: What is the true nature of the Jedi mission?

Side note: There’s one small bit about riding an animal and force-bonding that I found awesome.

Highly recommended for any Star Wars fan. This is an incredible work that looks at a place in the timeline not nearly explored enough. The prospect of “filling in the blanks” would be a hard task for any writer, but Gray does it with perfection in this novel.
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Top reviews from other countries

K. G. A. AlaviTop Contributor: Star Wars
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
What is right
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on May 4, 2019
I was a little disappointed in this book. It was ok and good in most places. I think my main problem with the book is having read the entire Jedi Apprentice series I had a very different picture in my mind of Qui Gon Jinn and Obi Wan. This being a new universe this could be...See more
I was a little disappointed in this book. It was ok and good in most places. I think my main problem with the book is having read the entire Jedi Apprentice series I had a very different picture in my mind of Qui Gon Jinn and Obi Wan. This being a new universe this could be forgiven, and Claudia Gray does a very good job with her own characters, but for me she just did not seem to Qui Gon and the Jedi right for me. My problem with the Jedi was they seemed to need rescuing as much as the who they went on to rescue. I agree with Qui Gon they acted more like political enforcers the guardians of justice. In fairness the Samuri that the Jedi are based did that their Shogun''s word as the law without question, but as a Star Wars no. The story is good but a bit slow, and does need a heavy dose of action. The parts that were good to great are things with young Qui Gon and Dooku. The book does give a reason Qui Gon was so obsessed with Anakin being the chosen one, the steps of Dooku''s eventual turn, as well Obi Wan''s dislike for flying. A good prequel to Episode 1, but not my favourite versions of the main characters. Good new editions (of her own characters), and possible a prophecy for the future but we will have to see how that one plays out.
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Daniel
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Interesting Qui-Gon and Obi-Wan Relationship
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on May 12, 2019
I’m a big fan of both Qui-Gon Jinn and Obi-Wan Kenobi, and I found their master and apprentice relationship really interesting in this novel, even if the story itself felt a little uneventful at times. The character development is excellent, as is the dialogue between the...See more
I’m a big fan of both Qui-Gon Jinn and Obi-Wan Kenobi, and I found their master and apprentice relationship really interesting in this novel, even if the story itself felt a little uneventful at times. The character development is excellent, as is the dialogue between the two. They feel like the two Jedi we meet in Episode I. Claudia Grey has always been an excellent character writer and clearly understands these two. I found the notion of both Jinn and Kenobi feeling like they had failed each other to some degree within their relationship really interesting. Jinn in particular comes across as a very confident Jedi in Episode I, so it was fascinating to see that this was not always the case. Really good character development. Although I very much enjoyed the book, the story does feel quite slow at times and then everything seems to happen awfully quick at the end, in terms of plot points being wrapped and bit too conveniently. I didn’t see the ‘who done it’ plot twist coming at the end, which is a testament to the quality of the author, but it did all feel a little bit inconsequential once the events had transpired. If you’re a fan of Qui-Gon and Obi-Wan, I do recommend this novel. There are some nice character moments and interesting exchanges which really flesh the characters out. Another Jedi, Rael Aveross, is also an interesting character - essentially a Jedi who loves and holds on to attachments, with a dark past. If you’re looking for a more action packed Star Wars novel, then I suggest looking elsewhere, but Master & Apprentice is still an interesting character read, worthy of it’s place in the new canon.
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Manoffsteel85
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Enjoyable read.
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on September 18, 2019
Qui-Gon and Obi-Wan were two of my favourite charecters in the prequels. So I was looking to this novel and I was not disapointed. After reading this novel I love the charecters even more. Qui-gon was ahead of his time and for me should of been the head of the coucil. Some...See more
Qui-Gon and Obi-Wan were two of my favourite charecters in the prequels. So I was looking to this novel and I was not disapointed. After reading this novel I love the charecters even more. Qui-gon was ahead of his time and for me should of been the head of the coucil. Some of the exspanded novels realy do not paint yoda in a great light. You can see why Obi-wan became one of the best in the order. Loved there whole Master and Apprentice ark showing us a different side of the Obi-Wan charecter than what we are used to. Master And Apprebtuce I feel is very well writren an enjoyable read a must for and star wars fan.
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AlaranTop Contributor: Doctor Who
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Pass on what you have learned
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on January 27, 2020
Set a few years prior to the events of ‘The Phantom Menace’, this novel focusses and, indeed, expands upon the first ‘typical’ Master and Padawan relationship introduced in Star Wars. It is concerned with a period when both Qui-Gon and Obi Wan are questioning their...See more
Set a few years prior to the events of ‘The Phantom Menace’, this novel focusses and, indeed, expands upon the first ‘typical’ Master and Padawan relationship introduced in Star Wars. It is concerned with a period when both Qui-Gon and Obi Wan are questioning their relationship, Qui-Gon believing he is failing his student whereas Obi Wan is beginning to wonder if his Master’s somewhat unconventional approach to being a Jedi is proving detrimental to them both. They are forced to acknowledge these concerns when Qui-Gon is offered a position on the Jedi Council that would result in him relinquishing his Padawan. Before, Qui-Gon can reach a decision, however, the two of them are sent as representatives to the world of Pijal where they are to oversee a young princess come of age and ascend to the throne. With their mission involving conspiracy, terrorists and a corrupt megacorporation, there is plenty of political intrigue and action to make the main plot entertaining and interesting. The strength of the novel, however, lies in its characterisation of Qui-Gon Jinn and the exploration of his relationships with his fellow Jedi. Qui-Gon is the main focus of the story, a relatively rare occurrence for the character. Much comes from his perspective. The novel covers a period of events that see him somewhat at odds with his Padawan, an old friend, the Jedi Council and the teachings of his old master, Dooku. Looking at his role as mentor to Obi Wan and his own time as a Padawan as well as the relationship between Dooku and Averros (Dooku’s Padawan before Qui-Gon and Qui-Gon’s friend), allows for plenty of comparison that provides a good exploration of the master/padawan dynamic. Averros’ tutoring of Princess Fanry coloured by the regrets of losing his own Padawan provide another perspective for looking at this area. All this and the various concerns it entails for the characters is woven into events on Pijal, exerting an influence upon them as they move towards a climactic conclusion. In the process the novel offers a look at pre-Sith Dooku and some of his reasoning for his later separation from the Jedi. It also expands upon the dichotomy of the Jedi and the Republic turning a blind eye to continuing slavery in the galaxy despite it being proclaimed illegal. Offering a look at the Republic and the Jedi before ‘The Phantom Menace’ which enriches the Prequal Trilogy, Claudia Gray has once more produced one of the stronger novels from Disney’s new canon.
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Laura Evans
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Fast paced with so much development
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on June 28, 2020
Master and Apprentice was a fantastic book looking at the relationship between Obi Wan Kenobi and Qui Gon Jinn before the events of the prequel trilogy. It was a fantastic way to get to know where the characters started out. At the start of this story their relationship as...See more
Master and Apprentice was a fantastic book looking at the relationship between Obi Wan Kenobi and Qui Gon Jinn before the events of the prequel trilogy. It was a fantastic way to get to know where the characters started out. At the start of this story their relationship as Master and Apprentice is very much on the rocks, to the extent of even considering assigning Kenobi to a new Jedi Master. It really delves into their oposite traits, particularly looking at how they each react to the rules of the Jedi. There are multiple plot lines running throughout looking at terrorism and slavery in particular, but what really took centre stage to me were the prophecies and how they linked to the plot and further plots within the canon stories. There were lots of Easter eggs within these parts of the book, which I just loved to work out each one and what they may mean. This also highlighted religion within the Jedi Order, reminding us they aren''t just the military force we see in the other stories. Each Jedi has a different reaction to prophecies, which illustrates their individual personalities, aswell as their connections with the force and the Jedi Order. I loved seeing Qui Gon and Obi Wan''s relationship develop and though they are by no means perfect by the end of the book, as we see in episode 1, this book shows how well they can work together too. Throughout the book there are flashbacks to when Qui Gon was younger, as apprentice under Dooku, it really creates comparisons in the bond with his own apprentice. All of the characters go through so much developmentin this book, the plot feels second to this, in the best way possible, as your learn to love the characters with all there flaws. There are strong themes of family in this book, particularly found family. I''m used to reading, and watching, so many Star Wars stories about forbidden love within the Jedi Order. It was interesting that this reflected onto the more paternal feelings between the Jedi Masters and their Padawans. They are told not to be distracted by these feelings and emotions they have for others, usually romantically, but it also shows how Masters, quite understandably, fill a more parental role. It takes different forms in all of the characters, and sometimes not for the best. Overall I thought this was a brilliant novel, with such complex relations between its characters, with plenty of development whilst still being a fast paced read.
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Master & Apprentice (Star Wars)




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Discover more Star Wars books! Set after Return of the Jedi, Alphabet Squadron follows a team of veteran pilots as they struggle to defeat the Empire once and for all. Discover the events that created one of the most iconic villains in Star Wars history. Before The Rise of Skywalker, Poe, Rey, and Finn must rebuild the Resistance after their devastating loss to the First Order. The prequel to Rogue One, revealing the origins of the Death Star in an intense tale of ambition and betrayal.

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