Let Your Mind Run: popular A Memoir of Thinking My Way to popular Victory sale

Let Your Mind Run: popular A Memoir of Thinking My Way to popular Victory sale

Let Your Mind Run: popular A Memoir of Thinking My Way to popular Victory sale

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NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER

Deena Kastor was a star youth runner with tremendous promise, yet her career almost ended after college, when her competitive method—run as hard as possible, for fear of losing—fostered a frustration and negativity and brought her to the brink of burnout. On the verge of quitting, she took a chance and moved to the high altitudes of Alamosa, Colorado, where legendary coach Joe Vigil had started the first professional distance-running team. There she encountered the idea that would transform her running career: the notion that changing her thinking—shaping her mind to be more encouraging, kind, and resilient—could make her faster than she’d ever imagined possible. Building a mind so strong would take years of effort and discipline, but it would propel Kastor to the pinnacle of running—to American records in every distance from the 5K to the marathon—and to the accomplishment of earning America’s first Olympic medal in the marathon in twenty years.

Let Your Mind Run is a fascinating intimate look inside the mind of an elite athlete, a remarkable story of achievement, and an insightful primer on how the small steps of cultivating positivity can give anyone a competitive edge.

Review

NAMED A BEST BOOK OF 2018 BY LIBRARY JOURNAL

“A candid account about the self-doubt that enters the mind of an elite athlete and how positive thinking made [Kastor] a champion both on and off the course.”
ATHLETES QUARTERLY

“Long-distance runner Deena Kastor shows the secret to her success – and as an Olympic medalist and the American female record holder in the marathon, she’s had more than a few – relies less on any inborn talents, but on ‘the power of thought, attitude and perspective.’ Through race day and training anecdotes, she reveals the mental habits anyone can use to unleash their physical and mental potential.”
FURTHERMORE FROM EQUINOX (5 Books High Performers Should Read This Month)

“I have been savoring every story, every morsel of motivation and empowerment; [Kastor] is one of my long time running heroes and I never want this one to end!”
RUNNING ''N'' READING

“Inspiring… [ Let Your Mind Run] details the mental techniques [Kastor] used to improve not just as an athlete but as a person.”
CONNECTICUT MAGAZINE

Let Your Mind Run is a fascinating read that has applications for all athletes in all sports… It’s about cultivating positivity as the launching pad for achieving great performances.”
SPORTING KID LIVE, National Alliance for Youth Sports

"Inspiring, fascinating and insightful... Some inspirational books make you feel, ''Wow, I could never do that.''  Let Your Mind Run makes you feel, ''Wow, I can be better today.'' By focusing on the mind game, Kastor and Hamilton make this book practical for anyone trying to overcome the biggest impediments to climbing that next hill of growth."
SHAWN ACHOR, New York Times bestselling author of The Happiness Advantage and Big Potential

“There are running legends, and then there''s Deena Kastor. I''ve always looked to Deena for inspiration in racing and in life. What she has accomplished is incredible, but how she''s done it is fascinating. In her captivating new memoir, Kastor takes us on a run through her psyche so we can learn from a true master. Let Your Mind Run will fine tune your mindset for optimal performance both on and off the road!”
SCOTT JUREK, champion ultrarunner and New York Times bestselling author of Eat and Run
 
"When Deena Kastor came from behind to medal in the Olympic marathon, it breathed life back into a generation of U.S. distance running. I’ve hoped many times since then for the most profound story leading to that day: Kastor’s battle against fear and doubt (and heat). Here it is, as riveting as a race itself.”
DAVID EPSTEIN, author of The Sports Gene

“Deena Kastor is one of the greatest bodies in distance running, but this book captures what is so groundbreaking about her mind.  Let Your Mind Run gives us the privilege of watching Deena’s mind become her greatest asset as an athlete and as a positive, thriving, well-balanced person—from her earliest races to her Olympic career and beyond. Living and training with Deena in Mammoth Lakes has been a great joy of my career and has certainly shaped me into the athlete I am today. I invite you to explore  Let Your Mind Run and peer into the life of my greatest mentor.”
ALEXI PAPPAS, Olympian, writer, and filmmaker

“In Let Your Mind Run, Deena Kastor captures the essence of the relationship between life and running, bringing her mental strategies and joie de vivre within stride for all of us. This is more than a memoir—it’s a gift to everyone who looks to find balance and a healthy pace in life and sport.”
JOAN BENOIT SAMUELSON, gold-medal Olympic marathoner and author of Running Tide

"Engaging... [ Let Your Mind Run] is a gift to all who are passionate about running and who seek to find balance with mental conditioning... A heartfelt and impressive memoir from one of America''s treasured runners."
BOOKLIST
 
Let Your Mind Run shares the mentality of a champion without the clichés and platitudes we''ve come to expect from books on sports. This is something entirely different, a fascinating collection of specific moments of discovery and the ways they come to life on the run. Runner or not, this book will change you. Required reading for anyone in pursuit of excellence.”
LAUREN FLESHMAN, co-author of the Believe Training Journal

"Deena Kastor showed great promise as a high school runner, but lost her confidence. In Let Your Mind Run, she explains how she changed her thinking, got back on track, and became America''s greatest-ever woman distance runner. It''s not about doing harder workouts; it''s about taking charge of your mind. Through her journey, we learn how to use her techniques to reach new heights in our own pursuits."
AMBY BURFOOT, winner of the 1968 Boston Marathon and author of Run Forever

About the Author

Deena Kastor is an Olympic medalist and the American record holder in the marathon. She lives in Mammoth Lakes, California.

Michelle Hamilton is a health and fitness journalist. Her work has appeared in Runner’s World, Bicycling, Women’s Health, and other publications.

Excerpt. © Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved.

Running seemed fail-proof. There were no tryouts, no one was cut, everyone participated and got a ribbon. Most kids started with the sprints, but my mom ruled them out because a few girls in the valley were already racing at a national level, including future Olympian Marion Jones. Ever protective, my mom thought if I got clobbered in the sprints, my self-esteem would plummet, so she had me join the distance-running group.

My dad drove us all to the track on the first day. I was braiding Lesley’s hair when we pulled in to the school and the chaotic scene caught our attention. Kids were jumping into sandboxes, arching over bars, falling into big blue mattresses. Coaches were shouting and pointing and clapping. My mom, with a plush stadium cushion in one hand and my sister’s hand in the other, made a beeline toward the bleachers. I followed my dad, who had offered again to be a volunteer coach. We scanned the field to find the distance team and were eventually directed to a group of about eight boys and girls huddled around head coach Sal Pratts.

Coach Pratts was a big personality stuffed into a short, strong frame. “Today’s warm--up is a half mile on the track, then five minutes on the trail,” he said.

Wary of doing something wrong, I asked, “How many laps is a half mile?”

“Two,” he said.

My dad held up two fingers.

“Where’s the trail?”

Coach Pratts started to give me directions, but then said, “Just follow Noelle, if you can keep her in your sights.”

Noelle was tall and leggy, with short, curly brown hair and big white teeth highlighting a friendly smile. We hit the track. Noelle had been running for a few years and her experience showed, but I found I could keep up with her. This was a relief; I just had to watch her to know what to do.

Our half mile complete, I followed Noelle out the gate. The school abutted the foothills of the Santa Monica Mountains, and we followed a dusty trail a short way into the hills. I looked up and was taken aback. The land was open and wild. There were fields of dry grasses and chaparral broken only by large arching oak trees. Rattlesnakes hidden in yellow flowering brush shook their tails, and horses grazed in the fenced--off meadows. I’d seen the mountains on the drive to the mall and thought they were pretty, but never knew you could go into them. When it was time to turn around, I didn’t want to.

I loved running right from the start. It was simple and fun. It lacked rules and structure. There was no equipment to fuss with, no technique to learn. While the kids on the infield waited for their turn to jump or throw, Noelle and I and the other kids ran single file on the dusty cinder track. I remember thinking how lucky we runners were to be in constant motion. We were part of the action all the time. Running was also, to my surprise and delight, both solitary and social. One minute I was dashing down the track as if by myself on the side of the hill. The next, I was whipping around and making funny faces, trying to make my teammates laugh.

Best of all, running didn’t make me feel foolish or ridiculous, like I’d done something wrong. The ease of it made me feel competent and free. Everything we were asked to do, I could do. I ran and counted my laps. I warmed up on the trails, happily shooting 
out the gate with my teammates to the wild open space, and ran among the rabbits and deer. Sometimes, Coach Pratts let us run through the neighborhood. We stretched across the whole street, a pack of scrawny kids exploring manicured suburbia, unfettered, adventurous, going where none of the other kids got to go.
 
 

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4.7 out of 54.7 out of 5
923 global ratings

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Top reviews from the United States

dean13z
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Required reading for highly motivated people... not just runners
Reviewed in the United States on April 12, 2018
Which comes first success and winning or the thoughts of success and winning? The answer is - yes. Expertly written. Easy reading whether you are a runner or not. Concrete real examples of how your mental game (in sports and life) can develop through victories and defeats.... See more
Which comes first success and winning or the thoughts of success and winning? The answer is - yes. Expertly written. Easy reading whether you are a runner or not. Concrete real examples of how your mental game (in sports and life) can develop through victories and defeats. As a professional certified mental game coach I will now have this as required reading for my clients. This is a must have in your library.
42 people found this helpful
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KavehM
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
An enjoyable, easy read about Deena''s running career with some helpful pointers on positive attitude
Reviewed in the United States on May 11, 2018
[Full disclosure - I am a fairly serious recreational runner and a Deena Kastor fan. I have enjoyed following her career over the years.] The book is an easy-to-read chronicle of her running career interwoven with the development of her positive mental attitude... See more
[Full disclosure - I am a fairly serious recreational runner and a Deena Kastor fan. I have enjoyed following her career over the years.]

The book is an easy-to-read chronicle of her running career interwoven with the development of her positive mental attitude over that period. I''d say for at least the first half of the book, if not longer, it was really enjoyable (and helpful) to read about the different mental strategies/perspectives/tactics she developed and put into action to help her achieve her running goals. Some of them you will have surely been exposed to (but others you might not have), however it is helpful to read about how she implemented them to her advantage.

The reason for only 4 stars? The message does start to feel more contrived by the end, especially when she is also discussing how she has up to 3 top male college athletes with her every day for training, will spend weeks at the Olympic training center, has a husband who is a physical therapist/masseuse, etc. Of course, I am happy she had all those things - I''m all for supporting world-class U.S. athletes to compete on the international stage. Positive attitude is important, but there were many other components to her success and by the end, the way that message is incorporated starts to feel a lot like, "I was shaken by something... and then I remembered to be positive and grateful!"

The writing for many things she discusses (notably races but also life events) can feel cursory, especially when contrasted to what I recall as some excellent, turn-by-turn descriptions of races by Dean Karnazes in Ultramarathon Man.

I did enjoy it and would recommend it if you''re interested in reading about her career and picking up some helpful pointers on how to incorporate positive thinking into your life and endeavors. I commend her for writing a strong book on her career. I am certain it will be inspiring to both men and women in athletics; I know it was for me.
31 people found this helpful
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crowgirl follower
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A helping hand up!
Reviewed in the United States on June 2, 2018
Feeling overwhelmed? Depressed? Down on yourself? This book is helping me with all those feelings/ fears and more. 1.5 year ago I had a bad stroke. My own upbeat mindset recently crashed, this book came along out of the blue to help me see things more clearly. I am... See more
Feeling overwhelmed? Depressed? Down on yourself? This book is helping me with all those feelings/ fears and more. 1.5 year ago I had a bad stroke. My own upbeat mindset recently crashed, this book came along out of the blue to help me see things more clearly. I am determined to run and walk right again. Deena’s guidance is helping me to remember mindset is everything and self love is part of the balance. Very freeing book. I’m so grateful for it right now. So grateful! Thank you Deena and Andrew!
30 people found this helpful
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AKL
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A Motivating Memoir!
Reviewed in the United States on May 15, 2018
I don''t usually read motivational books or memoirs, but I have become a runner recently, and one who has become disenchanted with my progress.This was the book I needed - without being cheesy or giving overly-broad advice, Deena shares her story of overcoming the... See more
I don''t usually read motivational books or memoirs, but I have become a runner recently, and one who has become disenchanted with my progress.This was the book I needed - without being cheesy or giving overly-broad advice, Deena shares her story of overcoming the limitations she had set for herself, showing you don''t always win, and showing that you can work hard and not always see the results of that work but that is - in itself- part of the process.This was a quick read and motivating. I also like that she didn''t overshare about her personal life but kept on point.
13 people found this helpful
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Niccabod
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Stop letting your thinking get in the way of your action.
Reviewed in the United States on July 18, 2018
I''m not typically one for non-fiction or one for reading about athletes, but this book was just what I needed to get out of my head and start enjoying running again. While I can''t relate to being an elite runner (this 10-minute-miler has no aspirations of running really... See more
I''m not typically one for non-fiction or one for reading about athletes, but this book was just what I needed to get out of my head and start enjoying running again. While I can''t relate to being an elite runner (this 10-minute-miler has no aspirations of running really anything under a 9:00 minute mile), I can relate to finding a way to take the negatives and turn them into positives. A really good book for runners or for anyone who needs to embrace positive thinking.
7 people found this helpful
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HJ
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
You''ll be glad to read this ..
Reviewed in the United States on April 13, 2018
First non technical book I''ve read in over a decade, it was the first book I couldn''t put down, and simply engulfed it in under 2 hours. After taking my dogs out for a run around the farm I pick up the book again and read it again. It has put a different perspective on my... See more
First non technical book I''ve read in over a decade, it was the first book I couldn''t put down, and simply engulfed it in under 2 hours. After taking my dogs out for a run around the farm I pick up the book again and read it again. It has put a different perspective on my outlook. I now look for good instead of looking at the negative side of the moment.
15 people found this helpful
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K. Jones
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Fantastic
Reviewed in the United States on May 4, 2018
Great, great book! I don’t usually read books like this because they tend to be boring to me, but not this one! I loved reading about how she retrained her brain to counteract the negative thoughts as they came to her. She is a fine athlete and this is a good read.... See more
Great, great book! I don’t usually read books like this because they tend to be boring to me, but not this one! I loved reading about how she retrained her brain to counteract the negative thoughts as they came to her. She is a fine athlete and this is a good read. Highly recommend.
13 people found this helpful
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CMaximus
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Getting Your Mind "Right"
Reviewed in the United States on September 22, 2021
I ''m fascinated with Deena''s career and accomplishments, so I couldn''t wait to read this book. It exceeded my expectations. She''s an inspiration to everyone, not just runners who are striving for a significant goal and can''t seem to "get over the hump." Summation: It''s not... See more
I ''m fascinated with Deena''s career and accomplishments, so I couldn''t wait to read this book. It exceeded my expectations. She''s an inspiration to everyone, not just runners who are striving for a significant goal and can''t seem to "get over the hump." Summation: It''s not about training harder-with the ensuing pain and suffering; its about overcoming the mental obstacles you''ve set for yourself.

Read the book if your a runner or fan; its enjoyable at that level, but non-runners can still take these lessons to heart. My biggest takeaway may be Deena''s conclusion after winning silver at the 2004 Olympics. Be the best version of the athlete and person you can be.

Bonus: The book''s final chapter is on building an optimistic mentality. These are principles everyone should remind themselves of or be cognizant of-every single day.
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Top reviews from other countries

Pinwin
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A brilliant read.
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on June 10, 2018
Deena’s attitude to life and training is so inspiring. I’ve learned more from her use of positive thinking than from all the professionals’ books on the subject. I didn’t want this book to end. I’ll be nowhere near as fast, but this will help me on my training journey for...See more
Deena’s attitude to life and training is so inspiring. I’ve learned more from her use of positive thinking than from all the professionals’ books on the subject. I didn’t want this book to end. I’ll be nowhere near as fast, but this will help me on my training journey for Chicago 2018.
7 people found this helpful
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simon
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
gripping read
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on November 25, 2018
as a relatively new running this appealed to me yet I do not often seem to be able to read a full book they need to grip and interest me and this one did. A lot to think about not only as a runner and some interesting concepts
3 people found this helpful
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Ryan Day
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Changed my approach to running
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on July 25, 2020
I liked the reflections on running with a positive mind. The book is written in an easily understandable format and once I picked it up, I didn’t want to put it down.
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Ms. E. Robertson
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Life-changing
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on June 30, 2019
Beautiful, honest, positive and inspiring.
2 people found this helpful
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Amazon Customer
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Not just a running book its a guide to living
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on February 19, 2019
Brilliant book really grips from the beginning and written honestly. Didn’t want to put it down or end loads of life lessons that you will adapt in your everyday life.
2 people found this helpful
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Let Your Mind Run: popular A Memoir of Thinking My Way to popular Victory sale

Let Your Mind Run: popular A Memoir of Thinking My Way to popular Victory sale

Let Your Mind Run: popular A Memoir of Thinking My Way to popular Victory sale

Let Your Mind Run: popular A Memoir of Thinking My Way to popular Victory sale

Let Your Mind Run: popular A Memoir of Thinking My Way to popular Victory sale

Let Your Mind Run: popular A Memoir of Thinking My Way to popular Victory sale

Let Your Mind Run: popular A Memoir of Thinking My Way to popular Victory sale

Let Your Mind Run: popular A Memoir of Thinking My Way to popular Victory sale

Let Your Mind Run: popular A Memoir of Thinking My Way to popular Victory sale

Let Your Mind Run: popular A Memoir of Thinking My Way to popular Victory sale

Let Your Mind Run: popular A Memoir of Thinking My Way to popular Victory sale

Let Your Mind Run: popular A Memoir of Thinking My Way to popular Victory sale

Let Your Mind Run: popular A Memoir of Thinking My Way to popular Victory sale

Let Your Mind Run: popular A Memoir of Thinking My Way to popular Victory sale

Let Your Mind Run: popular A Memoir of Thinking My Way to popular Victory sale

Let Your Mind Run: popular A Memoir of Thinking My Way to popular Victory sale

Let Your Mind Run: popular A Memoir of Thinking My Way to popular Victory sale

Let Your Mind Run: popular A Memoir of Thinking My Way to popular Victory sale

Let Your Mind Run: popular A Memoir of Thinking My Way to popular Victory sale