Into 2021 the Fire: A Firsthand Account discount of the Most Extraordinary Battle in the Afghan War outlet online sale

Into 2021 the Fire: A Firsthand Account discount of the Most Extraordinary Battle in the Afghan War outlet online sale

Into 2021 the Fire: A Firsthand Account discount of the Most Extraordinary Battle in the Afghan War outlet online sale
Into 2021 the Fire: A Firsthand Account discount of the Most Extraordinary Battle in the Afghan War outlet online sale__below

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“The story of what Dakota did . . . will be told for generations.”—President Barack Obama, from remarks given at Meyer’s Medal of Honor ceremony

In the fall of 2009, Taliban insurgents ambushed a patrol of Afghan soldiers and Marine advisors in a mountain village called Ganjigal. Firing from entrenched positions, the enemy was positioned to wipe out one hundred men who were pinned down and were repeatedly refused artillery support. Ordered to remain behind with the vehicles, twenty-one year-old Marine corporal Dakota Meyer disobeyed orders and attacked to rescue his comrades.
           
With a brave driver at the wheel, Meyer stood in the gun turret exposed to withering fire, rallying Afghan troops to follow. Over the course of the five hours, he charged into the valley time and again. Employing a variety of machine guns, rifles, grenade launchers, and even a rock, Meyer repeatedly repulsed enemy attackers, carried wounded Afghan soldiers to safety, and provided cover for dozens of others to escape—supreme acts of valor and determination. In the end, Meyer and four stalwart comrades—an Army captain, an Afghan sergeant major, and two Marines—cleared the battlefield and came to grips with a tragedy they knew could have been avoided. For his actions on that day, Meyer became the first living Marine in three decades to be awarded the Medal of Honor.
 
Into the Fire tells the full story of the chaotic battle of Ganjigal for the first time,  in a compelling, human way that reveals it as a microcosm of our recent wars. Meyer takes us from his upbringing on a farm in Kentucky, through his Marine and sniper training, onto the battlefield, and into the vexed aftermath of his harrowing exploits in a battle that has become the stuff of legend. 
 
Investigations ensued, even as he was pitched back into battle alongside U.S. Army soldiers who embraced him as a fellow grunt. When it was over, he returned to the States to confront living with the loss of his closest friends. This is a tale of American values and upbringing, of stunning heroism, and of adjusting to loss and to civilian life.
 
We see it all through Meyer’s eyes, bullet by bullet, with raw honesty in telling of both the errors that resulted in tragedy and the resolve of American soldiers, U.S. Marines, and Afghan soldiers who’d been abandoned and faced certain death. 
 
Meticulously researched and thrillingly told, with nonstop pace and vivid detail, Into the Fire is the unvarnished story of a modern American hero.

Praise for Into the Fire
 
“A story of men at their best and at their worst . . . leaves you gaping in admiration at Medal of Honor winner Dakota Meyer’s courage.”— National Review
 
“Meyer’s dazzling bravery wasn’t momentary or impulsive but deliberate and sustained.”— The Wall Street Journal
 
“[A] cathartic, heartfelt account . . . Combat memoirs don’t get any more personal.”— Kirkus Reviews
 
“A great contribution to the discussion of an agonizingly complex subject.”— The Virginian-Pilot
 
Black Hawk Down meets Lone Survivor.”— Library Journal

Review

“A story of men at their best and at their worst . . . leaves you gaping in admiration at Medal of Honor winner Dakota Meyer’s courage.” National Review
 
“Meyer’s dazzling bravery wasn’t momentary or impulsive but deliberate and sustained.” The Wall Street Journal
 
“[A] cathartic, heartfelt account . . . Combat memoirs don’t get any more personal.” Kirkus Reviews
 
“A great contribution to the discussion of an agonizingly complex subject.” The Virginian-Pilot
 
Black Hawk Down meets Lone Survivor.Library Journal

Into the Fire is a deeply compelling tale of valor and duty.  Dakota Meyer will not identify as a hero, but he will, I think, accept the title warrior.  Dakota''s storytelling is precise and, for a Medal of Honor recipient, touchingly humble.  With deft prose he drops us smack in the middle of one of the most heinous small unit firefights of the current wars.  His insights into military tactics and politics in a war zone are sharp and uncompromising and work as a primer on infantry war fighting for the uninitiated.  Dakota was a magnificent marine and he is now an equally magnificent chronicler of warfare and the small group of people who do today''s fighting for America.” —Anthony Swofford, author of Jarhead

“The story of what Dakota did . . . will be told for generations.” —President Barack Obama, from remarks given at Meyer’s Medal of Honor ceremony

“Sergeant Meyer embodies all that is good about our nation’s Corps of Marines. . . . [His] heroic actions . . . will forever be etched in our Corps’ rich legacy of courage and valor.” —General James F. Amos, Commandant of the Marine Corps
 
“[Bing] West’s greatest strengths are his exceptional personal courage and his experienced perception of combat.” The Washington Post
 
“West [is] the grunts’ Homer.” —Los Angeles Times Book Review

About the Author

Dakota Meyer was born and raised in Columbia, Kentucky, and enlisted in the United States Marine Corps in 2006. A school-trained sniper and highly skilled infantryman, Corporal Meyer deployed to Iraq in 2007 and to Afghanistan in 2009. In 2011, he was awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor for his unyielding courage in the battle of Ganjigal. He now competes at charity events in skeet and rifle competitions. He also speaks frequently at schools and veterans’ events to raise awareness of our military and remains dedicated to the causes of our veterans. For the families of fallen troops, he has raised over one million dollars.
 
Bing West has written eleven books, including, with Jim Mattis, the #1  New York Times bestseller  Call Sign Chaos. He served as a Marine grunt in Vietnam and later as an assistant secretary of defense in the Reagan administration. He has been on hundreds of patrols in Iraq and Afghanistan, including many operations with General Mattis. He is a member of the Military History Working Group at the Hoover Institution. He lives with his wife, Betsy, in Hilton Head, South Carolina, and Newport, Rhode Island.

Excerpt. © Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved.

“I hope to have God on my side,” President Lincoln wrote in 1862, regarding the Union’s chances for victory in the Civil War, “but I must have Kentucky.”

That independence of spirit that you might call the nation’s soul is alive and well in the farming communities of central Kentucky.

My tiny town of Columbia might be considered poor by some standards. We don’t look at it like that. We enjoy being on our own, making do with what we scratch out for ourselves. The land is the reason people stay, generation after generation. If you drive through Columbia, you’ll see modest homes and trailers on slab foundations, set near the road. Fields stretch out where cattle and horses graze. Nowadays, farming provides only a supplemental income for most families. Commutes of twenty to sixty miles are common to hold down day jobs. But the land keeps people returning to their homes at the end of the workday—this feeling of space that comes with owning the acres outside your back door.

I’m not saying it’s always wonderful. My home life growing up was like tumbling inside a washing machine as I shuttled around the middle of Kentucky with my mother. She was never content to stay in one place, or with one man, for too long. She was as smart as she was independent, though, and always landed some job that brought in a little money.

Summers provided stability because my mother let me stay for weeks at Mike Meyer’s farm. Mike was briefly married to my mother, and he legally adopted me when I was born. As for my biological father, I had no contact with him. I learned early on that just because you come from the same blood as someone doesn’t mean they are family. Big Mike Meyer was my real dad as far as I was concerned.

Big Mike, a University of Kentucky graduate, owned a three-hundred-acre farm in Greensburg. He worked for Southern States, a farmer-owned cooperative, and brought in extra cash by raising beef cows. He lived in a plain house surrounded by open fields, with no curtains on the windows or pictures on the walls. He came home each day, put on his overalls, and tended to chores. Big Mike liked a steady routine, hunting, and the satisfaction of a well-run farm.

His dad, Dwight, owned a bigger farm on the other side of the creek. Dwight had served in the Marines and had later been an engineer. He held himself and others to rigid standards, as if he could see the proper ways of living by looking through his surveyor’s scope. He was, and still is, a fair but hard-to-please man. Despite my falling short fairly often, he always seemed to think I was someone worth having in the family. If you can feel that from your family, nothing can touch you.

When asked to describe my nature, Big Mike likes to tell the story of the ATV. Big Mike kept his all-terrain vehicle in the shed next to the house. Consisting of a motor, a seat, and three or four wheels, the ATV is the twentieth-century horse on farms across America. It goes anywhere on a few gallons of gasoline and you don’t have to shovel out the stable afterward. It can speed across fields, splash through creeks, and claw up hillsides. Without the ATV, life on a farm would be pure drudgery.

As a four-year-old, I was obsessed with it. I’d perch on the seat for hours, begging Dad to take me for one more ride. Finally, he decided to teach me a lesson.

“Ko,” he said, which was my nickname, “I have work to do. No more rides. When you’re big enough to start the machine yourself, you can drive it yourself.”

Since you had to kick-start it like a balky motorcycle, Dad thought it would be a year or more before I could do that. He’d sit on the stoop after work, smiling as I pushed my little legs down, time and again. This went on for weeks. The angrier I got, the more I tried. The thing would not budge. We are both pretty stubborn.

Big Mike was in the kitchen when he finally heard chug-chug and rushed outside to see me smiling brightly. I’d figured out how to climb up on the seat and jump down on the kick lever with all forty pounds of me until that damn ATV started. So he let me take it for a spin.

When I was eight, Dad brought me to his favorite tree stand on a cool October morning before dawn. He was brushing leaves away to climb up into the stand when a deer walked into the open behind him, not fifty feet from us.

“Dad,” I whispered, “there’s a deer.”

He squinted over his shoulder in the thin light.

“If it has horns,” he whispered, “shoot it.”

I let go with a shotgun. The deer leaped straight up in the air and crashed down on its side without quivering. I had killed an eight-point buck.

When we butchered the carcass, I was so excited that the warm guts and the heavy smell of the blood didn’t bother me. In the years after that, hitting moving animals and birds gradually became second nature. Cutting up fresh kills, ugly as that sounds, accustomed me to what I would encounter a decade later on the battlefield.

I had been in grammar school only a few years when my mother called Big Mike to say it seemed best if I stayed with him permanently. One short phone call and my life had changed for the better.

When I was eleven, my school held a contest for the best public speaker in each grade, and Big Mike encouraged me to enter.

I wrote down what I wanted to say, and Dad and I practiced my lines at least ten times a day.

“Slow down when you speak,” he said. “Think about your main message and say it clearly.”

Each speaker had three minutes. When it was my turn, I talked about Tinker Bell, the Cowboy Cow. We had no horses on our farm, so I picked out this big old cow and petted and talked to her every evening. When she learned to come to my voice, I rewarded her with peaches and Dr Pepper. Eventually, I was riding her to herd the other cows and lasso them. I concluded my speech by declaring that Tinker Bell and I could win any cow race in the county, maybe in the whole state.

My little speech won first prize for the sixth grade. From that tiny victory, I developed a confidence in speaking up that would later exasperate Marine sergeants (and cause me some grief on occasion).

Each year, Dad gave me responsibility for ever more serious chores. When I was in the seventh grade, Grandfather Dwight—Dad’s dad—came by one fall day while I was driving the big tractor, spiking balls of hay. This meant I was constantly shifting in the seat to look down at the steel forks and keep them aligned. Grandfather Dwight lit into me with his booming voice. He thought I’d tip over the tractor and be crushed.

When Dad got home an hour later, one glance told him what was going on with the tractor and me and Grandpa. I was trembling and shaky. Dad put his arm around me and looked at his father.

“He knows what he’s doing,” he said. “Ko, you go finish moving in hay.”

When I was in the eighth grade, we were still growing tobacco on our farm. In summer, when the broad leaves on the tobacco plants reached as tall as a man, you’d hack off the stem and thrust a wooden pole through the leaf. When you’d speared ten stalks—twenty or more pounds—you’d stack the load in the patch for a few days, or toss it onto a trailer to take and hang in the barn.

Mexican itinerant workers came to do the cutting. The pay was ten cents a spear. I asked Dad to hire me. I would work for an hour and then collapse for two. The Mexican workers stayed in the fields ten hours a day, hoisting sixty spears an hour. They were the hardest-working men I’ve ever seen.

You could wear long-sleeved clothes, gloves, and a mask or kerchief to protect yourself while cutting. I chose not to, so all that tobacco would rub in through my sweat. After work, I’d vomit until I had retched out the nicotine poison. One night I couldn’t stop throwing up and Dad rushed me to the hospital. Even after they pumped fluids into me, I was so dehydrated I couldn’t pee. The nurses were about to put in a urinary catheter when my dad, laughing at my expression, persuaded them not to. Most small farmers quit raising tobacco after the legal settlements in the late ’90s. I often wondered what became of those tough, cheerful Mexican workers.

I did all right in school, especially in math. Dad did not let up on me. When I left the laundry half done one day—I had stayed out too late and, for once, got home after he did—he had tossed the laundry out onto the lawn so I could start over and do it right.

But he didn’t do stuff like that often because he didn’t need to—I was listening and learning.

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Top reviews from the United States

Nausikaa
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Be Informed Before Reading
Reviewed in the United States on December 27, 2014
First off, I want to be clear about the focus of my review. Book reviews should center on the genre (type) of book, the content as it is expressed within the genre, and the quality of the writing itself (and how that writing meets or does not meet the demands of its target... See more
First off, I want to be clear about the focus of my review. Book reviews should center on the genre (type) of book, the content as it is expressed within the genre, and the quality of the writing itself (and how that writing meets or does not meet the demands of its target audience). In case you hadn''t already guessed, I am both an English teacher and a writer, so I would like to think I have a bit of experience in this area.
First, genre. This book is an autobiography, centering largely on Meyers'' experiences at the battle of Ganjigal and its aftermath. As a result, you are going to hear strong opinions, raw emotion, and bloody accounts. You may not agree with them. That is fine. But do not be shocked that this man, this Marine who came as close to Hell as the living can, has a lot to say about it. Again, this is an autobiography, written by the author about himself. Therefore, it should come as no surprise that the author will have definite opinions about his own life, and that they do not always please the masses. That is not the point of an autobiography. If bloody imagery, angry recriminations against military leaders, and honest portrayal of personal attributes don''t appeal to you, that is also fine. But autobiography is then not the genre for you. For rip-roaring accounts of military bravery where the good guys always win (and are perfect), the bad guys always lose, and no one dies, I suggest the fiction section. For everyone else, if you can handle the description above, you will probably appreciate this young man''s account. It satisfies the requirements for an autobiography quite well. I would have liked to know more about the author''s early life, but being that he seems naturally to be a man of few words--and that the book is about his combat experiences--I can easily overlook that.
As for the content, in the context of military literature, Meyers sums up the key points without becoming verbose. He does repeat certain points, but if you read the entire book, it is quite easy to see why! Some readers will find his lack of explanation of some of the acronyms frustrating. However, this problem is easily remedied by a Google search of any term not understood (just as you would look up words with which you were unfamiliar in a dictionary). I hope the possibility of encountering unfamiliar words will not discourage anyone from reading the book. There are maps and full-color pictures included in the book. I found the first confusing and the second illuminating. You may feel differently, but either way, these extras in no way detract from the reading. As far as actual text is concerned, while Meyers spends a lot of time downplaying his own actions, he simultaneously gives credit to those who helped that day. Those who appreciate fairness and humility in an autobiography will most likely enjoy this book. Some readers may find some of his comments about killing disturbing. That is understandable. I view these comments as coming from a grieving heart that has been trained for combat. I may not agree with every single thing the man says, but nor do I judge him for it.
Finally: writing meeting the target audience''s requirements. Some books are written for children, some for adults, some for specific segments of the population, and some for everyone. This book was written for everyone. Meyers wants people to know what happened (in hopes it will never happen again) and to honor his friends. It is not written by an academic; it is written by a young man who signed up for the Marines at 17 years old. The writing is of a simple and unsophisticated style. Bing West, the acclaimed journalist who helped Meyers write the book, makes very clear that the words are Meyers'', not West''s. If simple, unpolished writing is not for you, that is fine. But choose a different book. I enjoyed it precisely because Meyers, the man who was actually there, is the narrator.
This book is uncompromising in its candor and unapologetic in its pathos. It is not pretty, sanitized, or neatly wrapped up at the end. Life isn''t always that way, either. And that is what an autobiography is: the story of someone''s life. In this case, it is the story of a combat veteran, and as such, it meets the requirements for a good story. Furthermore, if this man can live through these experiences and be brave enough to share them, I feel that the least I can do is respectfully and thoughtfully listen to what he has to say. I can consider the large-scale effects of war, as well as its effects on individuals, without lapsing into hasty judgments. My advice for potential readers is to focus on the story itself, for that more than meets the requirements for compelling autobiography.
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Remee
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Who''s in charge ?
Reviewed in the United States on June 19, 2017
I work with guy who did two tours in Afghanistan. I knew him before he left for his first tour. He was army reserve before he was called to service. A willing and eager participant true blue American ready and happy to serve his country. The man that has come back isn''t... See more
I work with guy who did two tours in Afghanistan. I knew him before he left for his first tour. He was army reserve before he was called to service. A willing and eager participant true blue American ready and happy to serve his country. The man that has come back isn''t same guy who left. I know very little about the war in Afghanistan and wanted to learn a little of what my friend went through. This book describes one epic battle among many that have taken place. A very descript horrifying story. Dakota Meyer true American hero that I will always admire and not soon forget. I will never understand rules of engagement established by a committee that in lot of cases never have seen combat. This book is a must read very well written not sugar coated at all about the bad politics of war in general.
38 people found this helpful
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Mike Whitfield
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Excellent read about an authentic American hero and the internal destruction of the American military
Reviewed in the United States on February 10, 2019
This is one of those books that shows both the best and worst of humanity. War is so horrible that it always manages to bring out the worst, but often it also brings out the best. Dakota and Rod charged into a situation where death could be reasonably expected to result.... See more
This is one of those books that shows both the best and worst of humanity. War is so horrible that it always manages to bring out the worst, but often it also brings out the best. Dakota and Rod charged into a situation where death could be reasonably expected to result. They did so five times. One lucky round, one RPG or rocket, and they are dead or worse, incapacitated to be captured and tortured to death. Without them, probably no one escapes. We all like to think we’d be that guy, but I can admit I would come up short. These aren’t just good people, these are the absolute pinnacle of humanity.

This book also serves to illustrate how the US hampers itself, especially by not understanding our foes and our erstwhile allies. Sure, be too liberal with artillery and the Afghans will hate us, but at least they would respect us. By not supporting our own, we telegraph that we are weak. As a seventh century culture, the Afghans despise weakness, and having beaten the Soviet Union (and earlier, the British Empire) by simply being tougher, they have no doubt that the Taliban will ultimately win. This battle also vividly displays our paucity of planning. Our military commanders failed to clearly establish a chain of command, which in itself is an often fatal flaw that any amateur can see. They established a platoon as a QRF for a company, even though conditions of terrain prevented that platoon from having its multiplier effect. And ultimately that platoon chickened out, refusing to do its job. For a company intentionally going into a perfect ambush situation, the QRF should have been a second infantry company reinforced with that light armored platoon. And worst of all, they established a strong artillery force with ROE that intentionally neutered it. Artillery wins battles, but only if one uses it. Before sending in Americans, commanders have an absolute moral duty to evaluate conditions, reaction forces, and support according to the ROE and the potential threat rather than what the enemy usually does. It’s just like Benghazi, and it’s only because Meyer is The Pitbull that anyone received even the tiniest reprimand. It also shows our failure to properly use our technological advantage. Given that circumstances gave our seventh century foe ample time and Intel to set up the perfect ambush, that area should have been under constant electronic and optical surveillance. Then the Allied force would have been forewarned and the ambushers could have been surrounded and annihilated. THAT would have gotten the locals on our side.

One lone happy note: Swenson finally received his much-deserved Medal. Just as without Rod and Dakota likely no one would have been saved, without Swenson likely there would have been no one left to save.

Bing West has done an excellent job with this book. Rather than make war porn, he has described Meyer’s actions succinctly, enough detail so that everyone can get an idea (to the extent non-combatants can understand) the scope of the danger and valor without glorifying the violence, and used the balance of the book to show us who is Dakota Meyer, what made him what he is, what was the situation, how it reached that point, and the aftermath. It can’t have been easy for Dakota to not expound more on the betrayal, but together they present it factually, even showing how this betrayal was set up by higher higher. Excellent job, guys. Highly recommended.
15 people found this helpful
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Kindle Customer
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Honor and Respect
Reviewed in the United States on March 25, 2019
I never served in the military - let''s get that out there right up front. However, I had the honor of meeting (and instructing) a number of the men in this particular military community over several years. As a result of that exposure, and my own family''s service, I made... See more
I never served in the military - let''s get that out there right up front. However, I had the honor of meeting (and instructing) a number of the men in this particular military community over several years. As a result of that exposure, and my own family''s service, I made a decision to work diligently try to understand their mentality and commitment, as well as the risks, loss, and damage they endure - particularly the struggles of those who survive. I also swore to support them in any capacity I could - including buying the books that commemorate their stories. If anyone else wants to try and understand what we ask of these men, I recommend this book without hesitation. Make sure you have uninterrupted time to read - you won''t be able to put it down. All honor to Mr. Meyer, his brothers who died, and those who endure that loss.
15 people found this helpful
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No Name
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Devil Dog: Dakota Meyer’s Congressional Medal of Honor Story
Reviewed in the United States on July 4, 2020
This is an incredible true story of grit, courage, duty, and comradeship under fire in Afghanistan. Into the Fire is one of the most gripping and engaging combat stories I have ever read. I could not put it down as I read it in one sitting. Most heroes you read... See more
This is an incredible true story of grit, courage, duty, and comradeship under fire in Afghanistan. Into the Fire is one of the most gripping and engaging combat stories I have ever read. I could not put it down as I read it in one sitting.

Most heroes you read about, like the 9/11 responders, run towards danger once while everyone else runs away. Dakota Meyer disobeyed a direct order from a superior officer-which could have resulted in his being charged with disobeying a direct order and being dishonorably sent back home by the Marines-to drive into a Taliban ambush at a remote Afghan village in a dead end valley surrounded by mountains to help his teammates. Then he returned fire with the 50 caliber gun mounted on top of the Humvee he rode in, which he left time and again to help wounded soldiers, recover bodies and confront the Taliban.
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Amazon Customer
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Medal of Honor winner......
Reviewed in the United States on September 17, 2020
I read all medal of honor stories. I so applaud their incredible courage and determination for their brothers. I saw Dakota receive his Medal of Honor from "O" but knew nothing of Dakota at the time.. So, when I saw his book on kindle I knew I wanted to read it... See more
I read all medal of honor stories. I so applaud their incredible courage and determination for their brothers. I saw Dakota receive his Medal of Honor from "O" but knew nothing of Dakota at the time.. So, when I saw his book on kindle I knew I wanted to read it immediately.

While reading the battle description I held my breath everytime he charged back in (with Swenson supporting his rescue efforts). He seemed as though he had super human strength, determination and courage trying to save his team members. I was so upset and frustrated for him and the others encountering the FECKLESSNESS cowards who couldn''t make a decision to give him the air support (or any other support...like the cowardly quick reaction team who stood down). I couldn''t sleep that night after reading the battle description.

I hope Dakota has made peace with his feeling of failure of not being able to recover his team. If he had the support he needed his team would have made it out safely. He had no control over the lack of support from the commanders who were more concerned over making a mistake and sabotaging their paper pushing promotions.

A great read of heroism and bravery. I highly recommend this book. It will keep you on the edge of your seat.
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onc
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Heroic deeds; prosaic writing.
Reviewed in the United States on December 1, 2016
I ordered this after reading Jake Tapper''s excellent and well-written book on fighting in Afghanistan, "The Outpost." But I had a hard time getting into and finishing this one. If you''ve heard the adage that good writing "shows" the reader the story and... See more
I ordered this after reading Jake Tapper''s excellent and well-written book on fighting in Afghanistan, "The Outpost." But I had a hard time getting into and finishing this one. If you''ve heard the adage that good writing "shows" the reader the story and doesn''t "tell" it to him, you''ll understand my disappointment. It''s difficult to be critical about a book dealing with the kind of bravery exhibited by Mr. Meyer -- especially one written in the first person as this is. "Hero" is so overused as to be all but meaningless, but the word in all its true meaning describes this Marine sniper. Sadly, though, "prosaic" is the word to describe the kind of writing in "Into The Fire."
5 people found this helpful
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John S
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Great book about Marine Medal of Honor winner
Reviewed in the United States on August 12, 2021
This is a very well written book that does a great job of putting you as close to the action as you can get without actually being there. This is the story of USMC Dakota Meyer who with his brave actions in trying to rescue his team from an overwhelming ambush was awarded... See more
This is a very well written book that does a great job of putting you as close to the action as you can get without actually being there. This is the story of USMC Dakota Meyer who with his brave actions in trying to rescue his team from an overwhelming ambush was awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor.

Like other battles I''ve read about in Afghanistan the soldiers, Marines, SEALS, and Air Force personnel at the combat site all do their job and duty beyond what anyone could expect, but time after time they have been let down by command trying to direct the battle remotely. You will read about the same thing happening in this book. When Marines and soldiers are sent into battle they should be able to depend on support when needed, whether it is artillery, air support, or having reinforcements sent in. Unfortunately many times it hasn''t happened and good men have paid the price with their lives. Thank you Mr. Meyer for your service and sacrifice.
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Top reviews from other countries

B. Tynan
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Mental
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on July 30, 2021
Fantastic, brutally honest and entertaining, highly recommend. I''ve read more than a few books where the ROE and REMFs handicap the man on the ground doing the fighting but the frustration of Meyers and Swenson in this book is very well expressed. Buy it!
Fantastic, brutally honest and entertaining, highly recommend. I''ve read more than a few books where the ROE and REMFs handicap the man on the ground doing the fighting but the frustration of Meyers and Swenson in this book is very well expressed. Buy it!
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Marky mark
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Classic
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on April 25, 2020
Wonderful true account of one mans honour with his buddies A dyeing breed
Wonderful true account of one mans honour with his buddies
A dyeing breed
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Lillyput
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Excellent
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on November 22, 2019
Excellent just as expected
Excellent just as expected
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Mrs. Mckenna
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A grunts eye.
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on April 5, 2014
An eye opening account of an unknown battle(other than the USA),where the criminal failures in command have never been more graphically exposed.
An eye opening account of an unknown battle(other than the USA),where the criminal failures in command have never been more graphically exposed.
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Honeybal Lektor
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Unglaublicher Mut vor dem Hintergrund eines militärischen Debakels
Reviewed in Germany on November 17, 2015
Dakota Meyer schildert in seinem Buch seine Rolle und seine Erlebnisse während der dramatisch verlaufenden Operation Dancing Goat II im Jahr 2009 im Ganjigal-Tal in der afghanischen Provinz Kunar, die beinahe in einem völligen militärischen Fiasko geendet hätte. Für seinen...See more
Dakota Meyer schildert in seinem Buch seine Rolle und seine Erlebnisse während der dramatisch verlaufenden Operation Dancing Goat II im Jahr 2009 im Ganjigal-Tal in der afghanischen Provinz Kunar, die beinahe in einem völligen militärischen Fiasko geendet hätte. Für seinen Mut und seine Tapferkeit während dieser Kämpfe hat der Autor die Medal of Honor erhalten. Der Autor schildert zunächst kurz seine Kindheit und seine Jugend auf einer Farm in Kentucky, seine Ausbildung zum Infanteristen beim US Marine Corps und seine anschließende Scharfschützenausbildung beim Corp. Es folgt ein Einsatz im Irak, den er aber schon nach kurzer Zeit wegen einer Verletzung abbrechen muss. Im Sommer 2009 erfolgt die Verlegung nach Afghanistan um dort als Berater/Ausbilder für eine Einheit der afghanischen Armee (ANA) Dienst zu tun. Vom Combat Outpost (COP) Monti aus nimmt Meyer an ersten Einsätzen und Scharmützeln teil und wiederholt wird der COP von Aufständischen beschossen. Danach beginnt der Hauptteil des Buches mit der Operation im Ganjigal-Tal. Die Operation steht von Beginn an unter einem schlechten Stern, so dass die Einheiten schnell in einen gut geplanten Hinterhalt geraten, der zum dramatischen Kampf um Leben und Tod mit vielen Opfern wird. Hier übernimmt der junge Soldat Meyer eine unglaubliche Verantwortung und zeigt einen ebenso unglaublichen Mut, um seine vermissten Kameraden zu suchen und zu retten. Mehr möchte ich von der Handlung nicht mehr verraten, um niemanden die Spannung beim Lesen zu nehmen. Nach dem Einsatz und der Rückkehr in die USA hat der Autor mit einer posttraumatischen Belastungsstörung zu kämpfen, die ihn an den Rand des Zusammenbruchs bringt. Das Buch ist ein subjektiver und emotionaler persönlicher Bericht des Autors, wie er die gesamte Operation erlebt hat, was er dabei empfunden hat und auch eine schonungslose Kritik an Vorgesetzten, Strategie, Taktik und Rules of Engagement, die seiner Meinung nach dieses Debakel praktisch vorprogrammiert haben. In der Tat sind viele Entscheidungen nicht wirklich nachvollziehbar und der ganze Afghanistan-Einsatz an sich erscheint in einem äußerst fragwürdigen Licht, was Vorgehen und anhaltende und nachweisbare Erfolge angeht. Außer vielen Opfern auf beiden Seiten wurde in den letzten 14 Jahren tatsächlich wenig Zählbares erreicht. In jedem Fall ist dieses Buch eine sehr dramatische Lektüre und ein ehrlicher, subjektiver und authentischer Bericht eines jungen Soldaten, der für seine Kameraden unglaublichen Mut bewiesen hat, der aber auch die ganze Misere des Afghanistan-Einsatzes an sich evident werden lässt. Von mir volle Leseempfehlung.
Dakota Meyer schildert in seinem Buch seine Rolle und seine Erlebnisse während der dramatisch verlaufenden Operation Dancing Goat II im Jahr 2009 im Ganjigal-Tal in der afghanischen Provinz Kunar, die beinahe in einem völligen militärischen Fiasko geendet hätte. Für seinen Mut und seine Tapferkeit während dieser Kämpfe hat der Autor die Medal of Honor erhalten.

Der Autor schildert zunächst kurz seine Kindheit und seine Jugend auf einer Farm in Kentucky, seine Ausbildung zum Infanteristen beim US Marine Corps und seine anschließende Scharfschützenausbildung beim Corp. Es folgt ein Einsatz im Irak, den er aber schon nach kurzer Zeit wegen einer Verletzung abbrechen muss. Im Sommer 2009 erfolgt die Verlegung nach Afghanistan um dort als Berater/Ausbilder für eine Einheit der afghanischen Armee (ANA) Dienst zu tun. Vom Combat Outpost (COP) Monti aus nimmt Meyer an ersten Einsätzen und Scharmützeln teil und wiederholt wird der COP von Aufständischen beschossen.

Danach beginnt der Hauptteil des Buches mit der Operation im Ganjigal-Tal. Die Operation steht von Beginn an unter einem schlechten Stern, so dass die Einheiten schnell in einen gut geplanten Hinterhalt geraten, der zum dramatischen Kampf um Leben und Tod mit vielen Opfern wird. Hier übernimmt der junge Soldat Meyer eine unglaubliche Verantwortung und zeigt einen ebenso unglaublichen Mut, um seine vermissten Kameraden zu suchen und zu retten. Mehr möchte ich von der Handlung nicht mehr verraten, um niemanden die Spannung beim Lesen zu nehmen.

Nach dem Einsatz und der Rückkehr in die USA hat der Autor mit einer posttraumatischen Belastungsstörung zu kämpfen, die ihn an den Rand des Zusammenbruchs bringt. Das Buch ist ein subjektiver und emotionaler persönlicher Bericht des Autors, wie er die gesamte Operation erlebt hat, was er dabei empfunden hat und auch eine schonungslose Kritik an Vorgesetzten, Strategie, Taktik und Rules of Engagement, die seiner Meinung nach dieses Debakel praktisch vorprogrammiert haben. In der Tat sind viele Entscheidungen nicht wirklich nachvollziehbar und der ganze Afghanistan-Einsatz an sich erscheint in einem äußerst fragwürdigen Licht, was Vorgehen und anhaltende und nachweisbare Erfolge angeht. Außer vielen Opfern auf beiden Seiten wurde in den letzten 14 Jahren tatsächlich wenig Zählbares erreicht.

In jedem Fall ist dieses Buch eine sehr dramatische Lektüre und ein ehrlicher, subjektiver und authentischer Bericht eines jungen Soldaten, der für seine Kameraden unglaublichen Mut bewiesen hat, der aber auch die ganze Misere des Afghanistan-Einsatzes an sich evident werden lässt. Von mir volle Leseempfehlung.
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