Dementia new arrival Reimagined: Building a Life of Joy and Dignity from Beginning 2021 to End online

Dementia new arrival Reimagined: Building a Life of Joy and Dignity from Beginning 2021 to End online

Dementia new arrival Reimagined: Building a Life of Joy and Dignity from Beginning 2021 to End online

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The cultural and medical history of dementia and Alzheimer''s disease by a leading psychiatrist and bioethicist who urges us to turn our focus from cure to care.

Despite being a physician and a bioethicist, Tia Powell wasn''t prepared to address the challenges she faced when her grandmother, and then her mother, were diagnosed with dementia--not to mention confronting the hard truth that her own odds aren''t great. In the U.S., 10,000 baby boomers turn 65 every day; by the time a person reaches 85, their chances of having dementia approach 50 percent. And the truth is, there is no cure, and none coming soon, despite the perpetual promises by pharmaceutical companies that they are just one more expensive study away from a pill. Dr. Powell''s goal is to move the conversation away from an exclusive focus on cure to a genuine appreciation of care--what we can do for those who have dementia, and how to keep life meaningful and even joyful.

Reimagining Dementia is a moving combination of medicine and memoir, peeling back the untold history of dementia, from the story of Solomon Fuller, a black doctor whose research at the turn of the twentieth century anticipated important aspects of what we know about dementia today, to what has been gained and lost with the recent bonanza of funding for Alzheimer''s at the expense of other forms of the disease. In demystifying dementia, Dr. Powell helps us understand it with clearer eyes, from the point of view of both physician and caregiver. Ultimately, she wants us all to know that dementia is not only about loss--it''s also about the preservation of dignity and hope.

Review

" Dementia Reimagined is a brave, sobering, and profoundly humane book about one of the most serious challenges we face both as individuals and as a society. As a physician and bioethicist with a family history of dementia herself, Powell excavates the little-known history of the condition, while persuasively arguing that we must supplement our efforts to develop a cure by building an infrastructure of compassionate care to ensure a decent quality of life for our beloved elders and our future selves."— Steve Silberman, New York Times bestselling author of NeuroTribes: The Legacy of Autism and the Future of Neurodiversity

“Dementia is the defining disease of our era. Powell invites us to imagine a brighter way forward. Dementia Reimagined succeeds on many levels—it is informative and insightful, historically illuminating, scientifically accurate, socially savvy and so well written. The result is utterly engaging.”— Ira Byock, MD, author of The Four Things That Matter Most and Dying Well, Founder & Chief Medical Director, Institute for Human Caring, Providence St. Joseph Health

“In this effective demystification of dementia and Alzheimer''s disease, physician and bioethicist Powell reframes two debilitating cognitive disorders…. Throughout this insightful book, the author addresses the issues facing dementia victims and their caregivers with the kind of compassion and dignity everyone deserves at the end of life. A potent hybrid of medical history/journal and memoir.” Kirkus Reviews

“Eye-opening…. a good start toward reimagining this devastating disease.” Library Journal

“With candor and humor, Tia Powell examines all aspects of dementia: its history, treatment, and most importantly, how to care for people as they struggle to maintain dignity and autonomy. I recommend this book to anyone with a family or friend with dementia.”— Laurie G. Jacobs, MD, President, American Geriatrics Society and Chair of Medicine at Hackensack Meridian School of Medicine at Seton Hall

“Essential reading for anyone who cares for or about a person with dementia, treats a person with dementia, or is concerned about their own risk of dementia. Powell skillfully traces the sometimes surprising, often tragic, history of this disease and explains the current state of science and medicine and how they interact with advocacy and public policy. This book gives us a vision for what a meaningful life with dementia can look like.” —Carol Levine, Director, Families and Health Care Project, United Hospital Fund; author of Navigating Your Later Years for Dummies

“For all us baby boomers and our children joking about senior moments, it turns out that a lot of people living with dementia are actually having a hell of a good time. Read this book. Accepting what is and making the best of it requires a little planning, but the payoff in joy in the moment is huge.”— Diane E. Meier, MD, Director, Center to Advance Palliative Care

Beautiful and powerful. Dr. Powell has somehow achieved that magical and difficult balancing act of being both informative and deeply personal at the same time. So many people will be touched deeply by this book, and many will think very hard (and much more knowledgeably) about what they want, for themselves or their family member, when faced with dementia. It will go to the top of my list of books I recommend to families when they ask me what to read, and I will plead that my colleagues to read it, too.”— Henry L. Paulson, MD, PhD, Lucile Groff Professor of Neurology for Alzheimer''s Disease and Related Disorders in the Department of Neurology, University of Michigan

About the Author

Dr. Tia Powell is Director of the Montefiore Einstein Center for Bioethics and of the Einstein Cardozo Master of Science in Bioethics program. She is Professor of Epidemiology, Division of Bioethics, and Psychiatry. She has bioethics expertise in public policy, dementia, consultation, end of life care, decision-making capacity, bioethics education and the ethics of public health disasters. She served four years as Executive Director of the New York State Task Force on Life and the Law, which functions as New York State''s bioethics commission. She has worked with the Institute of Medicine on many projects related to public health and ethics, and most recently served on the 2017 report on community approaches to address health inequities. She is a board certified psychiatrist and Fellow of the New York Academy of Medicine, the American Psychiatric Association and The Hastings Center.

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4.4 out of 54.4 out of 5
125 global ratings

Top reviews from the United States

James
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Thinking about how to organize your life
Reviewed in the United States on April 8, 2019
I loved it. It is a warm, funny and informative book about how to live your life to maximize joy as you grow old -- even if you experience some cognitive decline, as many of us will.
15 people found this helpful
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Bill Dolworth
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Relevant Book For Those Coping With Dementia
Reviewed in the United States on June 20, 2019
A worthy entry into a crowded field of dementia books. The first half of this book is a bit of a history lesson. I very much liked the story of an early minority researcher whose groundbreaking work was lost to later generations. Also, interesting is the recounting of the... See more
A worthy entry into a crowded field of dementia books. The first half of this book is a bit of a history lesson. I very much liked the story of an early minority researcher whose groundbreaking work was lost to later generations. Also, interesting is the recounting of the poor treatment dementia patients have been subjected to over the years, whether it’s being institutionalized or given very questionable treatments. However, the chapter on the birth of elder advocacy in the US and by extension the Alzheimer’s Association and the chapter on the debate in the scientific community over whether dementia illnesses are biological or mentally based, I found to be mostly boring.

I liked the second half of the book much better. Among the topics covered are: if too much money is being allocated to research when we will really need it cover the future staggering costs of custodial care; the effects of this disease on caregivers both physically and monetarily; how to prepare to have a your best life when living with dementia; and the taboo subject of how to plan for a good death after being diagnosed with dementia.

I found the content and tone of this book to be similar to Being Mortal by Dr. Atul Gawande. If you liked that book you will certainly like Dementia Reimagined.
7 people found this helpful
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Jim Lanier
2.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Disappointing
Reviewed in the United States on July 16, 2019
I bought this book on the strength of the Fresh Air interview Dr. Powell gave. I was hoping this book would provide practical ideas for dealing with an aged parent with dementia. I was disappointed. Dementia reimagined, the title says. I don''t think 157 pages of... See more
I bought this book on the strength of the Fresh Air interview Dr. Powell gave.
I was hoping this book would provide practical ideas for dealing with an aged parent with dementia. I was disappointed.
Dementia reimagined, the title says. I don''t think 157 pages of the admittedly fruitless history of the disease qualifies as anything more than filler. The author recaps her history with her parents after that, more filler. She ends the book discussing her hopes for her own future, guessing she will also have dementia. This might qualify as a memoir more than the practical how-to guide I am still looking for.
I gave the book 2 stars for the single tip I found worthwhile: use familiar music to help the patient. I found this tip helpful. Now I''ve passed it on to you, so you don''t need to buy this book.
10 people found this helpful
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Chester Lane
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Mixed Feelings
Reviewed in the United States on July 2, 2019
I bought this book hoping to find guidance in caretaking for a dementia patient, so I had little interest in the portion of the book pertaining to the history of Alzheimer''s. However, the last chapter 12 - A Good Ending - is worth the price of the book in its discussion of... See more
I bought this book hoping to find guidance in caretaking for a dementia patient, so I had little interest in the portion of the book pertaining to the history of Alzheimer''s. However, the last chapter 12 - A Good Ending - is worth the price of the book in its discussion of expensive, ineffectual life support measures frequently inflicted upon us. Dr. Powell has an strong bias here, favoring comfort measures at life''s end. Those of you who want every conceivable measure taken to preserve your life will not agree with her bias. I fault her in not giving more guidance in the selection of assisted living facilities. On p. 271 she says "Look at how people live. Can they sleep and wake on their own schedule, or do they get roused rudely out of bed as in jail? Can they eat when they want, or will they miss breakfast if they don''t get up on the facility''s schedule?" I think it would be difficult to find a place that would serve you waffles at 3PM, but she provides little guidance on how to find a flexible facility: "A detailed analysis would take a book, but there are some helpful ones on the topic." The footnote she provides refers to a book about which one Amazon reviewer said, "I wish Span (the author) had found at least two seniors who anticipated their eventual decline - to see their future self vs. their current self - and made a rational, healthy and supportive change." These are the kind of people reading Dr. Powell''s book. IMHO, Powell should have provided a detailed checklist as to how to go about finding the kind of facility she advocates, or provided a good reference for such guidance.
8 people found this helpful
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InAl
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Moving Dementia from trying to cure to learning to care.
Reviewed in the United States on June 30, 2019
Dr. Powell''s experience with dementia goes beyond what she has seen in her office as a psychiatrist and into the personal since her mother and grandmother both had dementia. This gives her a unique perspective on treating the disease. As she points out, dementia is fatal... See more
Dr. Powell''s experience with dementia goes beyond what she has seen in her office as a psychiatrist and into the personal since her mother and grandmother both had dementia. This gives her a unique perspective on treating the disease. As she points out, dementia is fatal and cannot be cured. Slowed down a bit perhaps but not cured. So, how to we take care of people with the disease? By enabling them to live as full and joy filled life as we can help them to do. Her thoughts follow along with Dr. Atul Gawande''s as he expresses them in Being Mortal. Both of these authors point toward the value of palliative care in caring for fatal diseases. And toward the value of the love and support of members of the patient''s families and friends.
3 people found this helpful
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Amazon Customer
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A Must Read!
Reviewed in the United States on May 6, 2019
If you have ever known someone affected by dementia, then I would highly recommend reading Dementia Reimagined. It is beautifully written and easy to read.
7 people found this helpful
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Renee Robb-Cohen
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Interesting Point of View
Reviewed in the United States on September 26, 2019
I found the first half of the book to be difficult to plow through. Dr. Powell goes into excruciating detail about the history of mental illness, which she uses as a launching pad to get to the meat of her book. I did enjoy her point of view coming from both a psychiatric... See more
I found the first half of the book to be difficult to plow through. Dr. Powell goes into excruciating detail about the history of mental illness, which she uses as a launching pad to get to the meat of her book. I did enjoy her point of view coming from both a psychiatric and hospital ethicist background. The last half of her book was worth the wading through the history section - and again, her point of view is based on how she wants to be treated as a dementia patient if she develops the disease (as both her mother and grandmother died with dementia). I recommend reading this book, though I don''t think you''ll miss much if you start on Chapter 8, The Amyloid Hypothesis Falls Apart.
2 people found this helpful
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Debra
1.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Much about the medical and social history. It gave me nothing of how to best deal with my parent.
Reviewed in the United States on July 31, 2019
I am 2/3 through this book.
Thus far it addresses the history, definitions and funding for dementia and alzheimers. I''ve lost interest and learned little except for a couple of buzz words.
5 people found this helpful
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Top reviews from other countries

Margaret King
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Good to read about dementia and ideas
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on June 3, 2021
Thought provoking book!
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Dementia new arrival Reimagined: Building a Life of Joy and Dignity from Beginning 2021 to End online

Dementia new arrival Reimagined: Building a Life of Joy and Dignity from Beginning 2021 to End online

Dementia new arrival Reimagined: Building a Life of Joy and Dignity from Beginning 2021 to End online

Dementia new arrival Reimagined: Building a Life of Joy and Dignity from Beginning 2021 to End online

Dementia new arrival Reimagined: Building a Life of Joy and Dignity from Beginning 2021 to End online

Dementia new arrival Reimagined: Building a Life of Joy and Dignity from Beginning 2021 to End online

Dementia new arrival Reimagined: Building a Life of Joy and Dignity from Beginning 2021 to End online

Dementia new arrival Reimagined: Building a Life of Joy and Dignity from Beginning 2021 to End online

Dementia new arrival Reimagined: Building a Life of Joy and Dignity from Beginning 2021 to End online

Dementia new arrival Reimagined: Building a Life of Joy and Dignity from Beginning 2021 to End online

Dementia new arrival Reimagined: Building a Life of Joy and Dignity from Beginning 2021 to End online

Dementia new arrival Reimagined: Building a Life of Joy and Dignity from Beginning 2021 to End online

Dementia new arrival Reimagined: Building a Life of Joy and Dignity from Beginning 2021 to End online

Dementia new arrival Reimagined: Building a Life of Joy and Dignity from Beginning 2021 to End online

Dementia new arrival Reimagined: Building a Life of Joy and Dignity from Beginning 2021 to End online

Dementia new arrival Reimagined: Building a Life of Joy and Dignity from Beginning 2021 to End online