All Yesterdays: online Unique and Speculative Views of Dinosaurs and Other Prehistoric wholesale Animals outlet sale

All Yesterdays: online Unique and Speculative Views of Dinosaurs and Other Prehistoric wholesale Animals outlet sale

All Yesterdays: online Unique and Speculative Views of Dinosaurs and Other Prehistoric wholesale Animals outlet sale
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All Yesterdays is a book about the way we see dinosaurs and other prehistoric animals. Lavishly illustrated with over sixty original artworks, All Yesterdays aims to challenge our notions of how prehistoric animals looked and behaved. As a critical exploration of palaeontological art, All Yesterdays asks questions about what is probable, what is possible, and what is commonly ignored. Written by palaeozoologist Darren Naish, and palaeontological artists John Conway and C.M. Kosemen, All Yesterdays is scientifically rigorous and artistically imaginative in its approach to fossils of the past - and those of the future.

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4.6 out of 54.6 out of 5
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Top reviews from the United States

hatuletoh
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
An enjoyable reminder of how little we know
Reviewed in the United States on February 18, 2017
Dinosaurs are such a part of the cultural mainstream that most people, I would imagine, don''t even realize how speculative our depictions of even "well known" varieties are. I had some inkling: as a kid, I lost interest in studying dinosaurs when the news came out that... See more
Dinosaurs are such a part of the cultural mainstream that most people, I would imagine, don''t even realize how speculative our depictions of even "well known" varieties are. I had some inkling: as a kid, I lost interest in studying dinosaurs when the news came out that Brontosaurus was being renamed Apatasaurus (going off memory, but I think that''s the phonetic name, if not exactly the spelling) because the all-knowing scientists I idolized had put the wrong skull on the Brontosaurus skeleton. As a WAY too serious kid determined to know what was "real" and what wasn''t, I reasoned that if we couldn''t even be sure that one of the most famous dinos was "real", then it was possible nearly everything I knew about dinos might turn out to be bunk one day.

If my defeatist reaction was juvenile my skepticism was richly warranted, as this book illustrates in a thought-provoking and often hilarious way. It provides alternative reconstructions of extinct creatures--many but not all being dinosaurs--that are at least as plausible as the stereotypical portrayals of muscular lizards trying to chomp, or avoid being chomped, that we''re all familiar with.

In many cases the depictions are actually much more plausible, which was my favorite feature of the book. Dinos are good for business, and Dinos!...in ACTION! are better yet, to the point that it''s difficult to imagine them rolling happily in the mud like a pig, or without colorful scales and menacing claws, because nearly all depictions of them focus on the flamboyant, the bizarre, and of course, the ACTION!, no matter how speculative. But they were animals, and so surely they looked and behaved more like animals today than we usually imagine they did.

Or maybe not. But again, the alternative depictions in this book are at least as plausible and usually more so; and the text gives solidly scientific justifications without getting too dense or detailed. Equally enjoyable was the second part of the book, illustrations how modern animals might be reconstructed by paleontologists far in the future, based upon the parts of the animals'' bodies likely to be be preserved and potentially dug up as fossils. It''s funny and a bit unsettling, and I''ll say no more to avoid spoiling anything.

I really enjoyed this book, which is part of why I gave it four and not five stars: even at the reasonable price of $8-10, I want a book to have more than 30 or 40 minutes material in it. Yes, I understand that the illustrations are the focus but I wanted to see more of those, even if it meant not all could be as well done artistically, or that some had to have abbreviated text accompanying them. Other people, perhaps, will find the amount of material satisfactory, but like the carnivorous dinos depicted in most pictures, books, movies, etc., all I do is consume and I''m never satisfied...
21 people found this helpful
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Amazon Customer
1.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Very cheap printing. Not worth the money.
Reviewed in the United States on December 15, 2018
Very cheap printing for the price of the book. The paper is low quality and the images are quite lacking in quality as well. It was like I printed and bound the book myself at Kinkos. On top of it being the cheapest looking/feeling book I have ever owned, there was a... See more
Very cheap printing for the price of the book. The paper is low quality and the images are quite lacking in quality as well. It was like I printed and bound the book myself at Kinkos. On top of it being the cheapest looking/feeling book I have ever owned, there was a completely separate children’s book personalized for some 3 yr old in the very middle of the book. It’s as if the printer accidentally bound two separate books together. Really terrible experience and product over all. Too bad. The idea of the content sounded very cool.
17 people found this helpful
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jake chamberlin
2.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Another book inside?!
Reviewed in the United States on May 13, 2019
I think I’ll keep the book because it has all the original pages in it, but interestingly it also has some cheap cook book miss printed in the center, make me feel like very little went into the creation of this book but interesting enough that I’ll keep it for the laugh...
15 people found this helpful
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ASCII Aardvark
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
gift for my roommate, but now I want a copy
Reviewed in the United States on February 12, 2019
I got this for my dinosaur-loving roommate. I read it and love it so much I want a copy for my library too. It''s alternate views of the soft tissue and behaviors that point out the traditional ways we''ve depicted dinosaurs are just traditional and not necessarily... See more
I got this for my dinosaur-loving roommate. I read it and love it so much I want a copy for my library too.

It''s alternate views of the soft tissue and behaviors that point out the traditional ways we''ve depicted dinosaurs are just traditional and not necessarily accurate. Then it ends with current-animals reconstructed by a hypothetical future scientist after we''re all extinct, showing the types of errors that are probably common in our dino-reconstructions applied to animals we know.

Good pictures, interesting text explaining the limitations of current science in how these & more-traditional-dino-art are based on facts but also, by necessity, contain some educated-guesswork.
6 people found this helpful
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Marianna
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Brilliant, funny and imaginative
Reviewed in the United States on December 18, 2019
Excellent book. The author has imagination and the rare ability to question the assumptions we all take for granted. We are all taught by innumerable films and books how prehistoric animals looked like. I can only speak for myself, but it has never ocurred to me... See more
Excellent book. The author has imagination and the rare ability to question the assumptions we all take for granted.

We are all taught by innumerable films and books how prehistoric animals looked like. I can only speak for myself, but it has never ocurred to me that we might actually be taught a lot of nonsense. Thankfully, it did occur to Mr Naish. He explains why the popular images are probably wrong - and the reasons are convincing.

The part of the book I liked the most was where he shows how modern animals would look like if they were reconstructed like dinosaurs. It was hilariously funny. This is the most pleasant book I have lately read, and one of the most informative.
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Meghan
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
absolutely hilarious and thought provoking
Reviewed in the United States on April 15, 2021
phenomenal work, which goes into the known (and unknown!) follies that can befall paleo artists and reconstruction of fossilized animals. there''s also the wonderful ideas of behaviors these extinct creatures might have done we could never know about and poses not often seen... See more
phenomenal work, which goes into the known (and unknown!) follies that can befall paleo artists and reconstruction of fossilized animals. there''s also the wonderful ideas of behaviors these extinct creatures might have done we could never know about and poses not often seen in paleoart. the artwork is absolutely phenomenal.

if I''m honest, the best part to me is the second half of the book however, where you step into the shoes of a reader millions of years from now reading about such strange fossilized creatures as the "cat" and "hippo", reconstructed using the same techniques as modern day scientists use. it makes it so much easier to see how we don''t know what we don''t know when it comes to animals only known from a fragmentary record. if no animals have trunks in the future, how would someone know an elephant didn''t just have a mildly bulbous nose? if fur is discovered on a rat fossil, would it be extrapolated all other vertebrates like iguanas also had such coverings? a specimen known only from a few fragments might look completely absurd to us now but extrapolating from similar animals is what we have to do for many extinct creatures, even if snakes might be depicted with legs or hippos as thin, agile land carnivores.

overall I cannot express just how much of a FANTASTIC book this is, and it''s been on my radar for years now so I''m absolutely thrilled to finally have a physical copy to read through constantly.
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Sheri Martin
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
There are myriad beautiful and sometimes whimsical
Reviewed in the United States on April 9, 2015
A thoughtful book that puts the meat on the bones of dinosaurs. There are myriad beautiful and sometimes whimsical, or even amusing, paintings and drawings of dinosaurs going about their daily life... a life that includes much more than chasing prey or being chased. The... See more
A thoughtful book that puts the meat on the bones of dinosaurs. There are myriad beautiful and sometimes whimsical, or even amusing, paintings and drawings of dinosaurs going about their daily life... a life that includes much more than chasing prey or being chased. The last segment of the book explores how contemporary creatures might be reconstructed if aliens from the future tackled them with all the same tools and information we have as we reconstruct dinosaurs. Overall, a very charming, beautiful, interesting little book.

Other than wishing it were longer, I only have one real qualm with this book- many of the wonderful illustrations bridge across the whole spread, and since the book is perfect bound, that means a lot of detail and information is lost in the binding. I almost wish the book was coil bound so it would lay flat, because now I''m torn between protecting the spine and trying not to let it bother me, or crushing each spread flat to see the art but ultimately more or less destroying the book.
4 people found this helpful
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Tartarus
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Interesting speculations
Reviewed in the United States on February 2, 2014
When it comes to creatures known only from fossils, there''s a lot we don''t know. Old bones can only tell so much. Skin and integument only rarely gets fossilised, and fossil remains in general don''t really tell you about things like behaviour. Thus, a fair amount of... See more
When it comes to creatures known only from fossils, there''s a lot we don''t know. Old bones can only tell so much. Skin and integument only rarely gets fossilised, and fossil remains in general don''t really tell you about things like behaviour. Thus, a fair amount of speculation is permissible here.

This book shows portrayals of dinosaurs and other prehistoric creatures somewhat different from what one normally sees. Dinosaurs looking different from more standard portrayals based on features that didn''t get fossilised but which could plausibly have existed. Examples of behaviours that can only be guessed at but which make sense in the context of what we already know about nature. And so on. The book also portrays dinosaurs looking and acting as expected but not performing cliched roles that other portrayals have often shoved them into. Thus you see things like for instance a Tyrannosaurus rex that''s sleeping soundly rather than killing some prey animal as it is so often seen doing in so many other depictions.
The book also has a section where it shows speculative portrayals of how certain creatures of today might be portrayed by hypothetical sapient non-human beings of the far future. Thus you see such amusing inaccuracies as bony killer cats, predatory hippos, leathery winged birds and so on.

I quite like how the book takes into account many of the very basic but often overlooked aspects of nature in the descriptions of its various portrayals. For instance, noting how predators aren''t always on the hunt and prey aren''t always in danger, how creatures don''t always fit into the rigid roles people may often assume they fill, how playtime is fairly common among tetrapods and so on.

There are only two real criticisms I have of the book. The first involves a minor nitpick concerning the hippo speculation. While its not unreasonable that the hypothetical future palaeontologists falsely assume it to be a predator, it is a bit odd that its also noted one of its prey items were strange metal armoured creatures called cars. Yes, that''s right cars. Now I''m assuming these speculations are supposed to be occurring millions of years in the future. But if a car were left on its own it would take mere decades for it to rust away completely. Millions of years from now, there would be literally nothing to suggest cars or any other metal machines ever even existed on Earth. Perhaps its supposed to be that some freak event somehow preserved some cars in fossiliferous rock before they could rust away, but it still doesn''t sound all that convincing.
My second criticism is quite simply that the book felt somewhat too short.

Overall, though, this was quite an enjoyable book, with speculations that are both fascinating and plausible, and with some pretty decent artwork for each one. If you are interested in dinosaurs, or prehistoric life in general, you will probably enjoy this book.
2 people found this helpful
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Top reviews from other countries

Amazon Customer
2.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Wasted potential
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on April 21, 2021
This is a great concept but poorly executed. The art work isn’t well done, the book is short, and the quality cheap. This should have been done as a large coffee table book, something that could be enjoyed again and again. Its curry quality makes it look like a picture book...See more
This is a great concept but poorly executed. The art work isn’t well done, the book is short, and the quality cheap. This should have been done as a large coffee table book, something that could be enjoyed again and again. Its curry quality makes it look like a picture book for adults. I can see it being popular with 8-10 year olds still in their dinosaur phase. For the adult dinosaur fan however I would suggest getting it from the library instead.
2 people found this helpful
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GnorthernGnome
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A truly unique and wonderous look at the animals that once roamed our planet!
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on January 28, 2015
The world of palaeontology has gone through some rather major shake-ups in the last decade or so and our understanding of just what dinosaurs and their contemporaries looked like has been right at the epicentre. It''s about time we started to similarly shake-up palaeo-art...See more
The world of palaeontology has gone through some rather major shake-ups in the last decade or so and our understanding of just what dinosaurs and their contemporaries looked like has been right at the epicentre. It''s about time we started to similarly shake-up palaeo-art and hopefully this book will be the first of many to address just that! If you have any interest in palaeontology, biology or anatomical art then I cannot recommend this book enough. The idea is an extremely simple one: take a look at how dinosaurs and other extinct creatures are most commonly portrayed and ask why? Yet, to my knowledge, no one else has actually addressed this fascinating topic, let alone produced a host of fantastic illustrations to go along with their counter-points. The quality of the illustrations does vary a little, but that''s to be expected in a book with multiple contributors; plus, every piece has been cleverly designed to highlight a specific problem with your average palaeo-artist''s work. Frankly, if all this book contained was images of "classic" palaeo-art and the artist''s re-imagined (yet equally plausible) take on the same scene it would be interesting enough, but the in depth discussion that accompanies each piece is often astonishing. Conway and Naish have a fantastic way of writing that captures their own excitement surrounding the subjects and also manages to be factual and educational. They''re also not afraid to put their necks on the line, with some wonderfully weird ideas making the cut, nor admit to their/the field''s failings and limitations when it comes to guesstimating appearance and behaviour from, ostensibly, rocks. Then, of course, there is All Tomorrows. Though it occupies the end quarter of All Yesterdays, in many ways All Tomorrows is worthy of being a book just by itself. By juxtaposing the subject from the unknown creatures of the past to applying palaeo-art and speculative behaviour modelling to animals from the present, All Tomorrows serves both as a reminder that, ultimately, we''re always bound to be a little bit wrong, as well as driving home the many problems with current palaeo-art techniques the book is initially set up to confront. Basically, I came for the images of protoceratops climbing trees, but I stayed for the nightmare that is vampiric baboons! A fantastic book that will occupy a place of pride on my book shelf for many years to come.
5 people found this helpful
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Kristi
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Filling in the blanks
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on November 26, 2012
I have a confession to make. I''ve always been disappointed by reconstructions of dinosaurs. When I was growing up they were either grey, brown or green and invariably scaly, and just didn''t look like real animals. They were depicted in the same boringly cliched poses and...See more
I have a confession to make. I''ve always been disappointed by reconstructions of dinosaurs. When I was growing up they were either grey, brown or green and invariably scaly, and just didn''t look like real animals. They were depicted in the same boringly cliched poses and activities. Even post Jurassic Park, when they suddenly sprouted feathers, they still looked like freakish, half-mummified chimaeras. This informative, accessible book seeks to explain why, while delighting us with imaginative pictures of dinosaurs and other prehistoric creatures caught being just as diverse and behaviourally interesting as extant animals. It''s split into two parts. The first reconstructs fossil animals while trying to avoid the common errors and limitations of past reconstructions. The second, more whimsical (and short) section illustrates the effect those errors and limitations can have by reconstructing modern animals from imperfect fossils. The art is simple and lovely, the text easy to read without being dumbed down (the intro is actually the trickiest bit, and for the few potentially unfamiliar scientific terms used, there''s a short glossary at the back. For the real enthusiasts, there''s also a full bibliography for further reading). As a Kindle e book the colour pictures expand gloriously on a retina iPad, allowing you to see every brush stroke. It''s great to see dinosaurs looking interesting at last, in all their weird, well-fed and occasionally cute glory!
10 people found this helpful
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Penguuuu
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Fun book, just needs a better format.
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on December 31, 2014
This is a self published book and the format is a little odd, it is quite a slim volume, some of the pages though blank are still numbered and it needs a few tweaks, but being a Lulu publisher myself I find some of the formatting issues a bit awkward and so I recognised the...See more
This is a self published book and the format is a little odd, it is quite a slim volume, some of the pages though blank are still numbered and it needs a few tweaks, but being a Lulu publisher myself I find some of the formatting issues a bit awkward and so I recognised the issues the authors probably encountered. The book could be better if the format was different, more comic book shaped. Also buy this direct from Lulu.com and use the promo codes, you''ll save some more!
8 people found this helpful
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Davidson
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Fascinating, witty
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on October 25, 2013
A very odd book, almost a part of the growing genre of "speculative evolution", but based on real fossils and cleverly questioning our interpretations of those fossils. It''s on one hand very specialised in deconstructing dinosaur art, but on the other hand, very...See more
A very odd book, almost a part of the growing genre of "speculative evolution", but based on real fossils and cleverly questioning our interpretations of those fossils. It''s on one hand very specialised in deconstructing dinosaur art, but on the other hand, very accessible and enchanting because it reminds us that dinosaurs were not mere structures of bones, but living creatures with their own idiosyncratic behaviour. We might never know how they behaved, but we are reminded nonetheless that they were real living creatures, which could be as odd and as unpredictable as any creature alive today. It has to be seen in the context of other books on dinosaurs, but as such, I highly recommend it.
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All Yesterdays: online Unique and Speculative Views of Dinosaurs and Other Prehistoric wholesale Animals outlet sale

All Yesterdays: online Unique and Speculative Views of Dinosaurs and Other Prehistoric wholesale Animals outlet sale

All Yesterdays: online Unique and Speculative Views of Dinosaurs and Other Prehistoric wholesale Animals outlet sale

All Yesterdays: online Unique and Speculative Views of Dinosaurs and Other Prehistoric wholesale Animals outlet sale

All Yesterdays: online Unique and Speculative Views of Dinosaurs and Other Prehistoric wholesale Animals outlet sale

All Yesterdays: online Unique and Speculative Views of Dinosaurs and Other Prehistoric wholesale Animals outlet sale

All Yesterdays: online Unique and Speculative Views of Dinosaurs and Other Prehistoric wholesale Animals outlet sale

All Yesterdays: online Unique and Speculative Views of Dinosaurs and Other Prehistoric wholesale Animals outlet sale

All Yesterdays: online Unique and Speculative Views of Dinosaurs and Other Prehistoric wholesale Animals outlet sale

All Yesterdays: online Unique and Speculative Views of Dinosaurs and Other Prehistoric wholesale Animals outlet sale

All Yesterdays: online Unique and Speculative Views of Dinosaurs and Other Prehistoric wholesale Animals outlet sale

All Yesterdays: online Unique and Speculative Views of Dinosaurs and Other Prehistoric wholesale Animals outlet sale

All Yesterdays: online Unique and Speculative Views of Dinosaurs and Other Prehistoric wholesale Animals outlet sale

All Yesterdays: online Unique and Speculative Views of Dinosaurs and Other Prehistoric wholesale Animals outlet sale

All Yesterdays: online Unique and Speculative Views of Dinosaurs and Other Prehistoric wholesale Animals outlet sale

All Yesterdays: online Unique and Speculative Views of Dinosaurs and Other Prehistoric wholesale Animals outlet sale

All Yesterdays: online Unique and Speculative Views of Dinosaurs and Other Prehistoric wholesale Animals outlet sale

All Yesterdays: online Unique and Speculative Views of Dinosaurs and Other Prehistoric wholesale Animals outlet sale

All Yesterdays: online Unique and Speculative Views of Dinosaurs and Other Prehistoric wholesale Animals outlet sale

All Yesterdays: online Unique and Speculative Views of Dinosaurs and Other Prehistoric wholesale Animals outlet sale

All Yesterdays: online Unique and Speculative Views of Dinosaurs and Other Prehistoric wholesale Animals outlet sale

All Yesterdays: online Unique and Speculative Views of Dinosaurs and Other Prehistoric wholesale Animals outlet sale